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Full text of "Saint Leo College Catalogue"

Saint 
Leo 

College 



CATALOGUE 1971-7 







Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2012 with funding from 

LYRASIS Members and Sloan Foundation 



http://archive.org/details/saintleocollege197172sain 



Saint Leo College 



Saint Leo, Florida 33574 




CATALOGUE 
1971-1972 



That In All Things God May Be Glorified 



RECOGNITION 

Accreditation: Southern Association of Colleges and Schools 
Teacher Education Program Approval — 
Florida State Board of Education 



Announcements contained in this publication are subject to change without 
notice, and may not be regarded in the nature of binding obligations on the 
College. The College reserves the right to change any provision or requirement 
when such action will serve the interests of the College or its students. 

Published annually by Saint Leo College 



CONTENTS 



Locational Map 4 

Directory of Correspondence 5 

Academic Calendar 6 

The Campus Scene 

History and Philosophy 8 

The Campus 9 

Special Events 12 

Admission to Saint Leo College 

Admission Eligibility 14 

Admission Procedures 16 

Financial Information 

Expenses 17 

Student Aid 20 

The Academic Program 

The Basic Studies Program 24 

Concentration 25 

Seminars 26 

Flexibility 26 

Comprehensives 26 

Preparation for Professions 27 

Department of Secretarial Science 27 

Tutorial Services 27 

Studies Abroad 27 

Academic Regulations 

Grading 30 

Courses and Credits 30 

Credit by Examination 31 

Drops and Adds 31 

Scholastic Deficiency 32 

Withdrawals 32 

Degree Requirements 33 

Honors and Awards 34 

Student Life and Activities 

Counseling 36 

Religious Life 37 

Recreational and Athletic Program 37 

Organizations 38 

Residential Living 39 

The Alumni Association 41 

Courses of Instruction 42 

Board of Trustees 90 

Administrative Officials 92 

Faculty Directory 93 

Index 98 

Campus Building Directory 100 



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DIRECTORY OF CORRESPONDENCE 

Saint Leo College Telephone (904) 588-4101 

Saint Leo, Florida 33574 Dade City Exchange 

Correspondence to the College should be addressed as follows: 

Application and Admission Information Director of Records 

and Admissions 

Academic Affairs Vice President for Academic Affairs 

Academic Records, Transcripts Director of Records and Admissions 

Admissions, Catalogues, and 

General Information Director of Records and Admissions 

Alumni Affairs .... Vice President for Development and Public Relations 

Athletics Director of Athletics 

Continuing Education Director of Continuing Education 

Gifts and 

Bequests Vice President for Development and Public Relations 

Financial Affairs Comptroller 

Financial Aid Director of Financial Aid 

Housing Dean of Student Affairs 

Library Director of Library Services 

Public Affairs Director of Public Information 

Religious Matters Director of Religious Programs 

Student Activities Dean of Student Affairs 



Business office hours are from 9:00 a.m. until noon, and from 1 :00 p.m. until 
4:30 p.m. Monday through Friday except legal holidays. Members of the Col- 
lege staff are available at other times for interview by appointment. 

Students may be reached by calling dormitory numbers or private student 
telephones. Please call direct whenever possible. Dormitory numbers are 
supplied with housing information. 

Mail Service to Students . . Saint Leo College 

Saint Leo, Florida 33574 

Express Saint Leo College 

San Antonio, Florida 33576 

Freight Saint Leo College 

San Antonio, Florida 33576 

Air Travel Tampa, Florida 

Rail Travel San Antonio, Florida 

Bus Travel Dade City, Florida 

Car 1-75 to State Road 52 (East) or 

U.S, 301 to Dade City (West) 



ACADEMIC CALENDAR 



First Semester 1971-1972 



Second Semester 1971-1972 



Sun. - Mon., August 29-30 
Students Arrive 

Mon. - Wed., August 30 - Sept. 1 
Freshman Orientation 

Tues. - Wed., August 31 - Sept. 1 
Registration 

Thursday, September 2 
Classes Begin 

Monday, September 6 
Labor Day - No Classes 

Tuesday, September 7 
Classes Resume 

Thursday, September 9 

Last Day to Change Classes or 

Register Late 

Wednesday, October 20 
Advisory Grades Due 

Friday, November 5 

Last Day to Drop Courses or Withdraw 

from College Without Academic 

Penalty 

Wed. - Sun., November 24-28 
Thanksgiving Holidays 

Monday, November 29 
Classes Resume 

Saturday, December 11 
G.R.E. 

Tuesday, Decern t. .r 14 
Semester I Classes End 
Last Day to Withdraw 
from College 

Wed. -Sat., December 15-18 
Final Exams 



Monday, January 3 
All Students Arrive 
Orientation for New Students 

Tues. - Wed., January 4-5 
Registration 

Thursday, January 6 
Classes Begin 

Tuesday, January 11 

Last Day to Remove Incomplete from 

Semester I 

Thursday, January 13 

Last Day to Change Classes or 

Register Late 

Mon. - Wed., February 14-16 
Semester Break - No Classes 

Thursday, February 1 7 
Classes Resume 

Thursday, February 24 
Advisory Grades Due 

Saturday, February 26 
G.R.E. 

Friday, March 10 

Last day to Drop Courses or Withdraw 

from College Without Academic 

Penalty 

Thurs. - Mon., Mar. 30 - April 3 
Easter Vacation 

Tuesday, April 4 
Classes Resume 

Friday, April 21 

Semester II Classes End 

Last Day to Withdraw from College 

Mon. - Thurs., April 24-27 
Final Exams 



Tuesday, December 21 
Final Grades Due 



Wednesday, April 26 
Senior Grades Due 




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Friday, April 28 

Residence Halls Close at Noon 

Except for Seniors and May Session 

Students 

Registration for May Session 

Sunday, April 30 

Baccalaureate and Commencement 

May Session 

Monday, May 1 

May Session Classes Begin 

All Grades Due for Second Semester 

Tuesday, May 9 

Last Day to Withdraw Without 

Academic Penalty 

Monday, May 15 

Last Day to Remove Incompletes 

From Semester II 



Sunday, June 25 

Registration for Summer Session 



Saturday, June 24 
Residence Halls Open 



Monday, June 26 
Classes Begin 

Monday, July 3 

Last Day to Withdraw Without 

Academic Penalty 

Tuesday, July 4 
Independence Day - No Classes 

Wednesday, July 5 
Classes Resume 



Friday, May 26 

May Session Classes End 

Grades Due 



Summer Session 1971-1972 



Friday, July 28 

Summer Session Classes End 



Saturday, July 29 

Residence Halls Close at Noon 



THE CAMPUS SCENE 



The History and Philosophy of the College 



Saint Leo College is a Catholic, coeducational, liberal arts institution offering 
a four-year program leading to the degree of Bachelor of Arts. It is a young 
college but its roots lie deep in the past. 

The Benedictine monks who founded the College have long been known as 
educators. In the sixth century Saint Benedict of Monte Cassino established a 
tradition of monasticism which strongly influenced the preservation and 
passing on of the heritage of Western civilization. 

Saint Leo College itself traces its awn history back more than three quarters 
of a century. On June 4, 1889, the Legislature of the State of Florida granted 
that the Order of Saint Benedict of Florida "shall have and possess the right 
and power of conferring the usual adacemic and other degrees granted by any 
college in this state." 

The aim was to provide for the young men of the local area, especially for the 
Catholic youth, an education of high quality. 

The school was known as Saint Leo Military Academy in its early days, but 
its name was changed to Saint Leo Preparatory School in 1930. Fully accred- 
ited, it offered a program of excellence not only for college-bound students 
but also for those for whom its program was terminal. 

By midcentury the Benedictines of Saint Leo decided to carry the develop- 
ment of the institution into higher education. In 1956 the lower division of 
Saint Leo College was established and, meeting all standards of state junior 
colleges for the Associate of Arts degree, it opened its doors in 1959 to both 
men and women. The four-year program was introduced in September of 
1963, and in April of 1967 the College awarded its first Bachelor's degrees to 
a charter class of sixty-four graduates. Full accreditation was granted by the 
Southern Association of Colleges and Schools on November 29, 1967. 

As the College developed, a summer institute was added in 1965, and a May 
session and summer workshops were introduced in 1967. The structure of the 
College was reorganized and control vested in an expanded Board of Trustees 
in January, 1969. 

The basic purpose of the College is to provide opportunities whereby its stu- 
dents may work toward a liberal education and, as a result, come to under- 
stand themselves and their relationships with other men, the world, and then- 
Creator. 



To this end, its curriculum is structured in seven broad areas: The Division of 
Philosophy and Theology, the Division of Language and Literature, the 
Division of Fine Arts, the Division of Natural Science and Mathematics, the 



Division of Social Science, the Division of Business Administration, and the 
Institute for Creative Teaching. These fields are offered not merely as units in 
themselves but rather as interrelated areas of knowledge contributing to the 
development of the whole man. 

As a Catholic institution, the College attempts to assist its students in formu- 
lating their values on a Judeo-Christian foundation. At the same time, the 
Saint Leo community is pluralistic, and its faculty of diversified background 
and viewpoint generates a stimulating intellectual atmosphere conducive to 
the attainment of its goals. 

The College believes that the opportunity for higher education should be 
afforded to as many as possible. Therefore, its admission standards allow not 
only for those students who have had academic success, but also for those 
whose past performance may not have been outstanding but whose potential 
is promising. However, Saint Leo does strive for high standards in its courses 
and does expect specific performance levels of its students. A distinctive mark 
of the College is the conviction that by dedicated teaching and personal 
interest its administration and faculty can inspire motivation and achievement 
in its students. 

The atmosphere of residential living, the relative smallness of the student 
body, and the Benedictine spirit of community afford a continuous 
opportunity for close relationships and associations between faculty and 
students outside the classroom setting. This environment is enhanced by the 
College's emphasis on the involvement of all of its members in the determina- 
tion and implementation of policies and regulations. 

Within this framework, Saint Leo College believes that it offers its students 
unique opportunities for a liberal education. 



The Campus 

Central Florida, of which Saint Leo College is a part, enjoys the many natural 
advantages which attract people to live, work, and retire in this region. The 
location is unique in that the pleasing rural atmosphere of the citrus groves, 
lakes, and beaches can be exchanged in about a half an hour by car for the 
surroundings of two nearby metropolitan areas. 

Between the two small cities of Dade City and San Antonio lies the campus 
of Saint Leo College, its rolling hills and richly wooded grounds covering an 
area of 1,100 acres. The campus edges on beautiful Lake Jovita, a large 
spring-fed lake which provides the best in swimming, skiing, and boating for 
the College and the surrounding communities. In addition, the campus in- 
cludes a large 18-hole golf course covering 100 acres along Route 52, a care- 
fully tended aviary displaying a variety of tropical birds, numerous athletic 
fields and courts, and ample parking facilities. 

Campus buildings unite the tradition of the past with the objectives of 
modern education through a pleasing combination of Spanish Florida ba- 
roque and contemporary architecture. The landmark of Saint Leo College is 
the Abbey Church tower, whose belfry chimes on the quarter hour may be 
heard at a distance and lend an air of serenity to the campus. Besides the 
Abbey Church, on the main quadrangle is Saint Leo Hall, Saint Francis Hall, 
and Saint Edward Hall in which many classes and offices are housed. 



Even the eye of the traditionalist, though, must note immediately with plea- 
sure the modern design of many new buildings on either side of the quad- 
rangle which provide classroom, laboratory, residence, dining, and recreation- 
al facilities. A $6 million development program is under way on the campus 
to provide new academic buildings, promote faculty development, increase 
student aid and endowment, and renovate existing facilities. 



Outstanding among the newer buildings is the Julia Deal Lewis Hall of 
Science, a three-story building occupied in 1968 by the Division of Natural 
Science and Mathematics. Besides faculty offices, classrooms, and the Divi- 
sional Library, the Department of Physics is located on the gound floor, and 
its facilities include two large physics laboratories, an isotope laboratory, and 
an electrical room. The Audio-Visual Technology Department is also located 
on this floor. 

The Department of Biology occupies the second floor, and in addition to a 
faculty office, biology, mathematics and psychology classrooms, there is a 
psychology laboratory, three biology laboratories, a faculty-student research 
laboratory, a darkroom, an animal room, preparation and collection rooms, 
and instrument rooms. A small greenhouse is also located at the second floor 
level. 

The Department of Chemistry is located on the third floor, and its facilities 
include a faculty office, classrooms, three laboratories for general, organic, 
analytical and physical chemistry, an instrumentation laboratory, faculty- 
student research laboratory, darkroom, balance room, stock and preparation 
rooms, and a drafting room. 

The William G. and Marie Selby Demonstration Auditorium adjoins the Hall 
of Science at the ground and second floor levels. It is a modern teaching audi- 
torium with tiered seating and closed-circuit television. 

Opposite the Julia Deal Lewis Hall of Science at the main entrance of the 
College, is the Reception Center. Joined by a patio and Campus Directory are 
the Office of Records and the Office of Admissions, which together provide 
maximum service to visitors, students, faculty, and staff. 

Nearby Crawford Hall provides numerous general classrooms. 

The William P. McDonald Student Center forms a hub of campus social 
activities and provides dining as well as recreational facilities. The campus 
store and the bookstore, are located on the ground floor, as well as a snack- 
bar and patio area, both popular places for student gatherings. In addition to 
a main dining hall on the second floor, Duncan Lounge, Lions Lounge, and 
the Kent Room provide facilities for on-campus special events, such as con- 
certs, lectures, films, and art exhibits. Significantly, the Center provides an 
informal climate for the casual meeting of students with faculty outside their 
scheduled classes. 

Between McDonald Student Center and Crawford Hall is a Gymnasium and 
adjoining Auditorium. Located here are faculty offices, the Security Office, 
music practice rooms, a listening room, and the theatre. 



The recently completed Activities Center is a teaching-physical education 
facility. The main gymnasium is also used for lectures and other educational 
events. A large heated outdoor swimming pool, bowling alleys, physical edu- 
cation classrooms, athletic training rooms, a dance studio, and a sauna bath 
are included in the facilities. 

In close proximity to the Activities Center is the Recreation Center, more 
commonly known as the Cage, which provides another popular meeting place 
for students, and furnishes such facilities as billiards and other games, a TV 
room, and a snack-bar. 

The Saint Leo College Library furnishes reading and study areas grouped 
around its comprehensive collection of books and reference material. The 
Library holds the famous Father Jerome Collection of Floridiana, the Father 
Vincent Collection of recordings from the Golden Age of Grand Opera, and 
the Archives of Saint Leo College. Also, a xerox room located on the second 
floor is available for student use. 

Returning to the quadrangle, one is reminded of the" 1 Spanish Florida influ- 
ence in the baroque architecture of Saint Francis Hall. On the first floor are 
the offices of the President, the Vice President for Academic Affairs, the Vice 
President for Development and Public Relations, the Director of Financial 
Aid, the Director of Public Information, and the Director of the Institute for 
Creative Teaching. The second floor includes classrooms, a Language Labora- 
tory, a Reading Laboratory, and the Office of the Director of Tutorial 
Services. 

The Language Laboratory utilizes contemporary techniques in language 
instruction and is equipped with thirty booths each containing earphones, 
microphones, and tape decks. The tapes provide lessons in French, German, 
and Spanish. Practice in the laboratory, always integrated with classroom 
work, enables the student to become proficient in the aural-oral aspects of a 
language. 

The Director of Tutorial Services organizes and directs the on-campus tutor- 
ing program. 

Adjacent Saint Leo Hall is constructed of blocks made by the founding 
Benedictine monks. Located in Saint Leo Hall is the Finance Office, the 
Office of the Comptroller, the Computer Center, and the Duplicating Room, 
in addition to residence facilities for men. The office of the Division of 
Language and Literature is also located here. 

The Saint Leo College Computer Center is a college-wide facility provided for 
faculty members and students who use extensive numerical calculations or 
large column data processing. The Computer Center provides the services of 
an IBM 1 1 30 Computing System and other subsidiary equipment. 

Across the Mall is Saint Edward Hall which houses male students and the Col- 
lege Dispensary. It is also the Student Affairs Center housing the Office of the 
Dean of Student Affairs, the Director of Women, the Director of Men, the 
Director of Spiritual Life, the Director of Student Organizations, and the Stu- 
dent Government Association offices. 

Also located in Saint Edward Hall is the Counseling Center which provides 
psychological, academic, and professional testing and counseling. 



11 



Office Building A houses the office of the Division of Fine Arts and the 
Office of Continuing Education. 

Carmel Hall houses faculty offices of the Division of Philosophy and Theol- 
ogy, the Division of Social Science, and the Division of Business Adminis- 
tration. 

Roderick Hall, Benoit Hall, Lee Marvin Hall, and the Villa are residence halls 
for men, while Marmion Hall, Women's New Residence Hall, and Priory Hall 
are residence halls for women. 

By the golf course is the Golf Club House, the headquarters for activities on 
the Saint Leo Golf Course. 



The Social Calendar and Special Events 

The social calendar at Saint Leo is a crowded one, but one arranged with 
regard for the best academic interests of the students. The College is 
convinced that an essential part of maturity is the ability to adjust pleasure 
and serious responsibility into an agreeable, balanced pattern of living. 

Recreation on the campus is stimulating and varied. Dances, lectures, musical 
programs, college theatre productions, spectator and participation sports, 
foreign and domestic films, teas and receptions, and a variety of choral groups 
are all part of the college scene. Greek Weekend, Winter Weekend, Home- 
coming, Parents Weekend, and Commencement are all exciting weekends. 

Parents Weekend takes place once each year. Among the many activities 
planned during the three and a half day weekend are the parents' attendance 
of classes with their sons and daughters, scheduled appointments with individ- 
ual faculty members, tours of various local attractions, and a Florida Bar- 
beque and Square Dance. Highlighting the Weekend program is a semi-formal 
President's Reception, Banquet, and Ball on Saturday evening. 

A Scholarship Convocation is held each semester. This Convocation is the 
College's way of recognizing its honor students and of providing its other stu- 
dents with some feeling for the formalities and ceremony surrounding 
academic excellence. 

March 21 is the Feast of Saint Benedict, founder of Western Monasticism and 
of the Benedictines. At Saint Leo College it is celebrated with a Concele- 
brated Mass. School organizations are represented in the celebration of the 
Feast and everyone is invited to attend. 

The College-Community Artist Series is sponsored by the Fine Arts Division 
of Saint Leo College. This Series seeks to make the artistry of superior 
singers, musicians, and dancers available to the people of Pasco, Hernando, 
and surrounding counties. The Series is a non-profit undertaking and proceeds 
in excess of expenses are used for music scholarships for deserving young 
people in the Saint Leo College area. Among the artists who have appeared in 
this Series are the Singing Boys of Monterrey, pianist Leonard Pennario, Thor 
Johnson's Nashville Little Symphony, Metropolitan Opera soprano Lillian 
Sukis, the Lubeck Choir of Lubeck, Germany, Preservation Hall Jazz Band, 
the National Opera Company, and the Impact of Brass. 



12 



The Art Exhibition Program is a continuous showing of paintings in the 
Duncan Lounge. Each showing usually lasts about two weeks, during which 
time faculty and students participate in exhibitions. Senior art students hold 
their own show and various exhibitions are brought to the campus from off- 
campus showings. 

The Theatre Program is responsible for the on-campus production of four 
plays every year. 

The annual Greek Weekend is sponsored by the Inter-Fraternity and Panhell- 
inic Council and colorfully symbolizes the brotherhood of man through 
sports events, social activities, dances, and concerts. Highlights of the Week- 
end include the marathon torch race, a chariot race, a motorcade, and the 
lighting of the bowl. The "crowning event" is the selection of the Greek 
Goddess. 

The Concert Program sponsors concerts given by the College Choir, the 
Chamber Choir, the Oratorio Chorus, and the Wind Ensemble. Music recitals 
are also held, with performances given by junior and senior music students of 
the College. 




13 



ADMISSION TO SAINT LEO CAMPUS 

Admission Eligibility 

Policy and Regular Entrance Requirements 



The admission policy of Saint Leo College is governed by the general princi- 
ple that the student who applies and is accepted possesses the ability to do 
college level work. Admission is open to any qualified applicant regardless of 
creed, race or national origin. 

The basic requirement for admission to Saint Leo College is graduation from 
a secondary school. Satisfactory scores on the Scholastic Af itude Test and 
positive recommendation from the high school guidance counselor are also 
required. 

Students seeking admission to the freshman class must present evidence of 
graduation from high school with 16 units, including the following: 

English 4 units 

Mathematics (Algebra and Geometry) 2 units 

Natural Science 1 unit 

History 1 unit 

Not more than 4 units in vocational and/or non-academic subjects may be 
included in the minimum of 16 high school units required for entrance to 
college. 

Students are assured of acceptance in the fall of their senior year who are 
enrolled in a college preparatory course; have a "B" average; are in the upper 
half of their class; have outstanding S.A.T. scores; and a recommendation 
from their guidance counselor. 

Students are assured of acceptance after the receipt of their first senior 
grades; who are enrolled in a college preparatory course; have a "C" average; 
have good S.A.T. scores; and a recommendation from their guidance counsel- 
or. 

Students will be considered for admission after receipt of their first senior 
grades; have submitted their S.A.T. scores; and have the recommendation of 
their guidance counselor and two of their senior year faculty members. 

Applicants receiving satisfactory scores on the General Education Develop- 
ment (GED) Tests may be admitted on the presentation of a State High 
School Equivalency Diploma. 

Early Admission 

Saint Leo College will accept candidates for early admission from schools 
which officially approve of this policy and whose programs of study are 
satisfactory. 

No student will be admitted unless he is highly recommended by the principal 
of the high school. 



14 



Students are required to take the College Board Scholastic Aptitude Test and 
those College Board Achievement Tests which the College has recommended. 
They will not be considered for early admission unless the test scores are 
satisfactory. Satisfactory will mean a score of better than 600 on each of the 
College Board Scholastic Aptitude Tests and a score of better than 600 on the 
achievement test on English Composition. 

Students may be admitted at the end of their third year of high school. Early 
admission students will be classified as regular students of the freshman year. 
However, full college credit will be allowed only after the student has com- 
pleted the sophomore year. 

Advanced Placement 

Saint Leo College invites applications from students who have taken College 
Board Advanced Placement Examinations. The college will evaluate the re- 
sults of these tests with the possibility of offering both college credit and 
advanced placement. Students with scores of 3 (creditable), 4 (honors), and 5 
(high honors) will be considered for credit (awarded only at the end of the 
first scholastic year) as well as for advanced placement. 



Junior College Graduates 

Junior College students who have followed a college parallel program and 
who will receive the Associate of Arts degree are eligible for admission. 

Saint Leo College will also accept the A. A. and A.S. degree in Police Adminis- 
tration in its entirety if the student seeks a Bachelor of Arts degree in sociol- 
ogy or psychology. 



Transfer Students 

A- student is classified as a transfer student if he has previously registered at 
any other college or university regardless of the amount of time spent in 
attendance or credit earned. 

Transfer credit is given only for those courses in which the student has 
received the equivalent of a grade of "C" and which are applicable to the 
program he wishes to take at Saint Leo College. 



Military Service Credits 

Saint Leo College recognizes United States Armed Forces Institute (USAFI) 
self-study or group-study courses if they are equivalent to courses offered at 
the College. 

Credit will be granted for completion of USAFI College Level Examination 
tests at the discretion of the Director of Records and Admissions. 

The College grants credits for military service or for military schools attended 
or Army Extension Courses completed while in the service, provided they are 
equivalent to courses offered at the College. 



15 



Foreign Students 

Saint Leo College does not provide facilities to teach foreign students the 
English language. Therefore, the foreign student must prove to have sufficient 
knowledge of English to enable him to pursue a full course of study for 
credit. Acceptable proof of knowledge is a satisfactory score on the Test of 
English as a Foreign Language, which is given quarterly by the Educational 
Testing Service at various testing centers around the world for a fee of ten 
dollars ($10.00). 

Special Students 

The College is prepared to admit a limited number of qualified applicants who 
wish to take selected courses for credit, but who do not ish to study for a 
degree at Saint Leo. Such applicants must submit evidence of graduation 
from a secondary school. A student in attendance at another college may 
present a statement from his Dean that he is in good standing and has per- 
mission to pursue courses at Saint Leo. A special student is subject to the 
same academic regulations and discipline as other students. However, he is 
charged for courses at the rate of $69.00 per credit hour, plus any special fees 
related to his particular courses. 

Re-Admission 

A student who voluntarily or involuntarily withdraws from the College loses 
degree-seeking status. It is therefore necessary for a student who wishes to 
return to the College to re-apply through the Office of Records. If a student 
has attended another institution during has absence from Saint Leo College, it 
will be necessary to have all his academic credentials sent to the Records 
Office. 

Degree-Seeking and Non-Degree-Seeking Students 

An applicant seeking admission to the College applies as a degree-seeking or as 
a non-degree-seeking student (special student). The candidate may apply as a 
full-time or part-time student. Following admission to Saint Leo College, 
non-degree-seeking students may apply for degree-seeking status through the 
Office of Admissions. 

ADMISSION PROCEDURES 

Application forms may be obtained from the Office of Admissions, Saint Leo 
College, Saint Leo, Florida 33574. 

A student must have the following material filed with the Admissions Office 
before the registration deadline of the session he is planning to attend: 

1. Completed application form, including high school guidance counselor's 
recommendation. 

2. A $5.00 application fee, which is neither refundable nor applicable 
against school fees. 

3. An official transcript of high school credits, or GED diploma, sent 
directly from the high school to the Office of Admissions. Students 
who have completed two years of college work need not submit a high 
school transcript. 

4. Scores on the College Entrance Examination Board (CEEB) Scholastic 
Aptitude Tests. (Information on testing dates and location of testing 



16 



centers can be obtained from high school counselors or directly from 
College Entrance Examination Board, P. O. Box 592, Princeton, New 
Jersy 08540). 

5. An official transcript of courses taken at each college which he has 
attended. 

6. A statement from the previous college that he is in good standing and 
eligible to return. 

7. Medical form to be completed by the student's physician. 

8. A recent black and white photograph. 

Evaluation of the Applicant 

If the application forms and other required records of the applicant are com- 
plete and in proper order, the application will be submitted to the admissions 
Committee for evaluation. Final acceptance of each applicant will be deter- 
mined by the Director of Admissions. Acceptance of admission by the 
transfer student is regarded as acceptance of the evaluation of credits for 
transfer. Appeal may be made to the Admissions Committee through the 
Director of Admissions. 



FINANCIAL INFORMATION 

Student Fees 1971-1972 

Resident Student Day Student 
Per Semester Per Year Per Semester Per Year- 
Tuition $820 $1640 $820 $1640 
Usual Residence Charge 560 1120 

Student Government 10 20 10 20 
Assessment 

Total $1390 $2780 $830 $1660 



The residence charge is calculated as follows: 

Room, utilities, linen, towels, & basic Per Semester Per Year 

laundry service $290* $580 



Food (optional) - Sufficient mealcards 
will be issued each semester for 
each student choosing this plan. 

Price includes Florida Sales Tax. 270 540 

Total $560 $1120 



*(Students living in Roderick Hall, St. Edward Hall, St. Charles Hall, and in unremodeled 
rooms in St. Leo Hall are charged $20 less per semester. Private rooms, when available, 
are $35 more per semester.) 

All resident student are billed at the rate of $1390 per semester. Adjustments in the 
residence charge are made during the first month of school. Differences in the student's 
favor are either credited to his account or refunded. 



17 



SCHEDULE OF PAYMENTS 



Date 



First Semester 

Charge 

Advance Payment (non- 
refundable) - due from 
new students upon ac- 
ceptance (including 
those entering in the 
second semester), and 
from returning students 

on or before 

Deposit due 

Balance due 



Lab and special fees . 
Total for first semester 

Second Semester 



Charge 

Deposit due December 1st 

Balance due One week before 

registration in 
January 
Lab and special fees . . February 1 st 
Total for second semester 



Resident 
Students 



Day 

Students 



Amount 



June 1st 


$100(1) 




$100 


July 15 th 


500 







One week before 








registration 








in September 


790 




730 


October 1st 


As billed 




As billed 




. $1390 




$830 


Date 




Amount 



$500 

890 
As billed 

$1390 



$100 

730 
As billed 

$830 



$15 each session 
25 each session 
25 each session 
50 each session 



(1) This reserves a room for resident students. 

Course and Laboratory Fees 

Introductory courses in science per course 

Advanced courses in science per course 

Art: Ceramics per course 

Music: Private Instruction per course 

Note: Instruments are available for rental through the Division of Fine Arts. 

Typing per course 1 5 each session 

Internship 25 each session 

Special Fees 

Application Fee $5.00 

Orientation Fee (all new students entering in the Fall) 25.00 

Tuition for part-time students (per credit hour) 69.00 

Late registration 5.00 

Add one course after registration 5.00 

Drop one course after registration 5.00 

Deferred examinations 

Final 10.00 

Mid-term 5.00 

Overload - in excess of 20 credit hours (per credit hour) 41 .00 

Credit by examination (per course) 50.00 

Graduation 35.00 

Transcripts (after first one) 2.00 

I. D. Cards (after first one) 2.00 

Motor vehicle registration and parking (Resident student) 12.00 

Motor vehicle registration and parking (Day student) 6.00 



18 



Room key deposit (refundable) 5.00 

Residence hall room changes 5.00 

Refundable room key deposit (male resident students) 5.00 

Refundable room damage deposit (women resident students) 25.00 

Post Office Boxes 

Post Office box rental is payable at the U. S. Post Office located on the cam- 
pus. 
Business Office Policies: 

1. The advance payment for the fall semester is not refundable unless 
the student becomes academically ineligible. Laboratory and special fees are 
not refundable. 

2. All regular charges are payable on or before the stated dates for each 
semester. Veterans attending under the G. I. Bill may, under special circum- 
stances, arrange with the Business Office for an adjusted payment schedule. 

3. Grants and loans administered by the College are credited to the stu- 
dent's account at the rate of one-half the amount of the award each semester. 
A student receiving an award from outside sources must present written 
evidence of the amount of the award and the manner in which it is to be paid, 
if credit is to be allowed against semester charges. Students on the Work- 
Study Program are paid by check bi-weekly for hours worked and may apply 
a portion of this toward their fees, if they so desire. 

4. No student will be permitted to register if any charges from a pre- 
vious semester are unpaid. 

Refunds 

In case of withdrawal from the College it is the responsibility of the student 
to make formal application through the Student Affairs Office before any 
refunds will be made. Any student asked to withdraw from the College for 
disciplinary reasons will receive no refunds. 

Refunds are made on the following schedules after deductions for non- 
refundable amounts: 
Tuition: 

Within the first week after classes begin 80 percent 

Within the second week after classes begin 60 percent 

Within the third week after classes begin 40 percent 

After three weeks no refund 

Residence charge: 

Within the first week after classes begin 80 percent 

Within the first month after classes begin 50 percent 

Within the second month after classes begin 25 percent 

After two months no refund 

Financial Responsibility 

No transcripts, letters of recommendation, certificates of attendance, or any 
other official documents will be made available to any student with financial 
indebtedness of any kind to Saint Leo College. 

Personal Property 

The College is not responsible for loss of, nor for damage to, the personal 
property of students. Ordinarily the insurance carried by a parent automa- 
tically provides for this or can be extended for this purpose. Students are 
encouraged to establish bank accounts at a local bank. 



19 



STUDENT AID 



Eligibility 

Any student is eligible to apply for scholarships and loans. The primary basis 
on which the selection is made is financial need, although character and 
academic record are also considered. Renewal of financial aid is determined 
by academic progress, continued financial need, and meeting the specific 
criteria of special awards. Each student must renew his application each 
school year. The deadline for receiving financial aid applications is March 1 of 
each year. 

Federal Programs 

The College participates in the following federal programs which require the 
filing of a Parents' Confidential Statement to the College Scholarship Service, 
Princeton, New Jersey. 

National Defense Student Loan Program. This program provides loans up to 
$1,000 per year or $5,000 during the entire period the student is enrolled in 
college. Repayment of the loan begins the first day of the ninth month after 
the student has discontinued his formal education or has graduated. The rate 
of interest is 3 per cent simple interest, beginning with the time repayment 
becomes due. The repayment period is ten years. However, if the recipient 
teaches as a full-time teacher in a school certified to be for children of 
primarily low income families, the entire loan may be cancelled at the rate of 
15 per cent per year for each year he teaches. Recipients who are members of 
the Armed Forces of the United States, the Peace Corps or Vista may have 
their repayment suspended for a period of three years. There is also cancella- 
tion provision for military service at a rate of 1 2Vi per cent of the total loan 
per year not to exceed 50 per cent of the loan. To qualify for a National 
Defense Student Loan, the applicant must be a citizen of the United States, 
be in financial need, and carry at least twelve hours of academic credit. The 
applicant is required to sign an oath of allegiance to the United States. 

Educational Opportunity Grants. This program provides funds of $200 to 
$1,000 from the Federal Government, with the equivalent from the College 
in the same amount. The matching funds from the College may be grants, 
work scholarships, and loans (either College or National Defense Student 
Loan). To qualify for an Educational Opportunity Grant, the applicant must 
be in exceptional financial need, show academic or creative promise, be a 
citizen of the United States, and unable financially to attend college without 
this grant. 

The College Work-Study Program. This program is similar to the Saint Leo 
Work Scholarship Program. By law, the recipient may not work more than 
fifteen hours per week when classes are in session and forty hours per week 
when classes are not in session. Payment for work done is on an hourly basis. 
To qualify, the applicant must be from a low or medium income family, a 
citizen of the United States, capable of maintaining a good standing in his 
course of studies, and accepted as a full-time student in the College. 

The College also participates in the following federal programs: 

Guaranteed Loan Program. This program is for subsidizing the educational 



20 



expenses of students whose financial means do not match the expenses of 
attending college. A student may borrow up to $1,000 per year with a total 
maximum of $7,500. The borrower from a family with an adjusted income of 
less than $15,000 a year pays no interest while is is attending college. The 
Federal Government will pay the full interest charged on this loan while the 
student attends school, and prior to the beginning of the repayment period. If 
the family's adjusted income is more than $15,000 per year, the student can 
still borrow money at the low rate (seven per cent simple interest), secured 
by the Federal Government, but he must pay the entire interest on the loan. 
Principal to be repaid within five to ten years, beginning nine months after 
graduation. To make application for a Guaranteed Loan, the student should 
apply to a Commercial bank, mutual savings bank, savings and loan associa- 
tion, credit union, or other eligible lending agency in his home community. 
Additional information and an application may be obtained by writing to the 
State Office of the state in which the student resides. 

Federally Insured Loan Program. This program was instigated for Florida 
because of the depletion of funds in the United Student Aid Funds Program. 
The benefits of this program are the same as those listed above under the 
Guaranteed Loan Program. To make application for a Federally Insured 
Loan, the student should obtain an application from participating banks, 
savings and loan associations, credit unions, college, or by writing to: 
Director, Higher Education, Region IV, Office of Education, DHEW, 50 
Seventh Street, N.E., Room 404, Atlanta, Georgia 30323. 

Law Enforcement Education Program. The LEEP program provides financial 
aid for college studies by police, courts and corrections employees, and stu- 
dents preparing for work in these fields. Two types of financial assistance are 
offered under the LEEP program: loans of up to $1,800 per year and grants 
of up to $300 per semester for in-service officers. Loan Cancellation benefits 
are at the rate of 25 per cent per year of service in law enforcement. Other- 
wise, loans carry 7 per cent interest and must be paid within ten years or at 
the rate of $50 per month whichever is the shorter period of time. 

United Student Aid Funds, Inc. Under this program, a student may borrow 
up to $1,500 per year. Repayments begin the first day of the tenth month 
after the student discontinues school. The rate of interest is 7 per cent simple 
interest. Under the Higher Education Act of 1965, the U. S. Commissioner of 
Education will pay the lending institution the 7 per cent interest on eligible 
loans while the student is in college and until repayment period begins. To 
make application for a United Student Aid Fund loan, the student should 
apply at his local bank or write to the Financial Aid Director of the College. 

Veterans Administration 

Veterans and dependents of veterans enrolled at Saint Leo College are eligible 
for training benefits by the Veterans Administration. Those planning to 
attend college should consult the local Veterans Administration Office before 
applying for admission and should then follow the regular admission proce- 
dure. V. A. benefits are paid directly to the student. In order to receive 
payment from the Veterans Administration the student must fill out a special 
form, available at the Office of Records. Training time is designated by the 
Veterans Administration for each semester as follows: 

14 or more semester hours full time 

10-14 semester hours three-quarter time 

7-9 semester hours one-half time 

1-6 semester hours less than one-half time 



21 



State Programs 

Saint Leo College participates in the following programs. 

Florida Student Loan Program. For students who have been Florida residents 
for three years. The loan must be repaid with 4 per cent interest over a 60 
month period following college attendance. The maximum amount to be 
borrowed is $1 ,200 per year. 

Florida Regents Scholarship Program. The student must rank in the top 10 
per cent of high school seniors in Florida as judged by the statewide 12th 
grade examination and his high school record is at least 3.5 on a 4.0 scale. 
This scholarship may be renewed annually as long as the recipient maintains a 
3.0 average in college. 

Florida Teacher Scholarship Program. Recipients are selected on the basis of a 
competitive examination. Recipients must be a resident of the State of 
Florida for at least one year. It is an award of $600 per year in the form of a 
loan which may be cancelled by teaching in the State of Florida. 

Local Programs 

Dade City Kiwanis Club Scholarship. An award given to a graduate of Pasco 
Comprehensive High School who exemplifies the ideals of a Kiwanian as to 
service and character. 

San Antonio Jaycee Scholarship. An award given to a needy student of that 
community who has demonstrated academic ability and good civic 
responsibility. 

Saint Leo College Programs 

In addition to the above student aid, the following college grants are 
available. 

Grants-in-Aid. Grants-in-Aid are outright gifts to students who have excep- 
tional and superior qualifications and who will render a genuine service to the 
College. 

Presidential Scholarships. The College provides Presidential Scholarships to 
sons and daughters of full-time employees of the College. This scholarship is 
for tuition only. 

Saint Leo Work Scholarships. The College provides work opportunities for 
deserving students who have a particular talent which can be utilized for the 
benefit of the College. Students on a work scholarship may work up to 15 
hours per week and are paid on an hourly basis. 

The Boh Sykes Foundation Scholarship. Two $100.00 scholarships are 
available each semester to Florida residents demonstrating unusual leadership, 
patriotism, and Americanism. 

Alan R. Hart Scholarship. To be used for students who demonstrate need and 
academic ability. 

Paul W. Resop Family Scholarship. A yearly scholarship to be used for a stu- 
dent studying for the priesthood in the Order of Saint Benedict of Florida. 



22 



Dennis Vacenovsky Scholarship Fund. Income from this fund will be used for 

students who show qualities of leadership, loyalty and service to. the College, 

academic ability and who demonstrate financial need. 

Marion Elizabeth Flagg Scholarship Fund. Income from this fund will be used 

to assist deserving music students at the college 

Dr. Herbert F. Wolf Scholarship Fund. Income from this fund will be used to 

assist deserving students in science and mathematics. 

Applications for Financial Aid 

Applications should be requested from the Saint Leo College Financial Aid 
Office, Saint Leo, Florida 33574. The application should be completed and 
returned to the same address by March 1 of each year. 

A copy of the Parents' Confidential Statement, which may be obtained from 
a secondary school, Saint Leo College Financial Aid Office, or the College 
Scholarship Service, P. O. Box 176, Princeton, New Jersey 08540, should be 
completed and returned to the College Scholarship Service. Students are 
encouraged to file the PCS as early as January of their senior year in high 
school. 




23 



THE ACADEMIC PROGRAM 



The liberal arts curriculum of Saint Leo College is designed to enable a stu- 
dent to present himself as a person of culture and conscience in our time. To 
this end, the academic program first acquaints the student with the disciplines 
and philosophies of the major areas of human knowledge — the humanities, 
science, and the social sciences — and allows him to pursue a concentration in 
the area of his interest and talent. Throughout, the program encourages the 
student to relate the vast aggregate of human knowledge with the principles 
of his chosen area of concentration in order to gain a knowledge of himself, a 
concern for others, and a perspective of his options and responsibilities in the 
modern world. 

The Basic Studies Program 

Saint Leo College places strong emphasis on a basic series of studies, recogniz- 
ing the need for its students to become acquainted with the major areas of 
human knowledge. The academic program is flexible in many ways in order 
to allow the student enough freedom of selection to begin to satisfy his own 
enthusiasm. Faculty advisors work with each student to guide him in selecting 
the courses that will best contribute to his specific educational and vocational 
goals. The Basic Studies Program offers the student two major advantages: 
first, it provides a liberal exposure to the arts and sciences; and second, it 
provides sufficient time to develop an area of concentration particularly 
suited to his interests, needs, and talents. 

While the Basic Studies Program requires study in five academic divisions of 
the College, the pattern of study is in part designed by the student himself. 

Required areas of Basic Studies are as follows: Two courses in English (EH 
121 and 122); one Basic Studies course from each of the following Divisions: 
Fine Arts, Language and Literature, Philosophy and Theology, Natural Sci- 
ence and Mathematics, Social Science; three other Basic Studies courses from 
any of these Divisions, for a total of 30 credit hours in Basic Studies. 

Considerable flexibility in choice in required areas of study is offered to the 
student from among the course offerings of the various Divisions. Basic 
Studies in Social Science may be satisfied by Education 1 2 1 , or 1 22 or by Eco- 
nomics 121, or 122. 

Basic Studies requirements in Physical Education: 

The Basic Studies requirements in Physical Education include a three year 
sequence: PHE 101-102; 201-202; 301-302. A special three-year sequence is 
designed for the students who, for physical causes, are unable to take the 
required program. 

The following students are not required to complete this program: 

1 . Students witli two years of military service. 

2. Students over thirty-five years of age. 

Students transferring with junior classification from institutions not requiring 
physical education must complete one year in Physical Education. 



24 



Junior College Program 

An A. A. degree from an accredited Junior College satisfies all Basic Studies 
requirements of Saint Leo College except for one year of physical education. 
In order to receive a bachelors degree from Saint Leo College the Junior Col- 
lege graduate must satisfy all the requirements of his concentration and must 
complete a minimum of 60 credit hours exclusive of credit hours for courses 
in physical education. 

Concentration 

In order to secure a concentrated focus on advanced work, the student 
usually selects his field of concentration before the completion of his sopho- 
more year. However, he may begin his concentration as early as the first 
semester of his freshman year if he is certain about his educational and 
vocational goals. In fact, if he expects to enter the fields of medicine, dentis- 
try, law, or a graduate school requiring extensive preparation in the natural 
sciences and mathematics, the student will save time by deciding early on his 
concentration. If he plans to teach, particularly in the secondary schools, he 
should not delay his decision beyond the first semester of his sophomore year 
in order to complete the required professional courses in education in the 
normal four year period. 

Intensive study in a concentration usually begins in the first semester of the 
junior year. Prior to beginning his study, the student is assigned to an advisor 
by the Chairman of the Division or Institute in which he is concentrating. 
Inasmuch as the interests, needs, and talents of each student may differ from 
those of any other, he may choose electives outside his concentration in 
individual conference with his advisor. 

To insure both breadth and an appropriate degree of specialization, it is 
expected that the student will usually complete 36 hours in a concentration. 

Students who plan to teach at the secondary level should complete, as elec- 
tives, the professional courses in education in addition to all the courses 
required in their concentration. 

The student must attain at least a 2.00 Grade Point Average in his concentra- 
tion in order to graduate. 

Fields of Concentration 

Art Mathematics 

Biology Music 

Business Administration Philosophy 

Business Education Physical Education 

Chemistry Political Science 



L^nemisiry ronucai aci 

Elementary Education Psychology 

English and Literature Sociology 

French Spanish 

German Theatre 
History 



25 



Lectures 

Periodically a guest lecturer, distinguished nationally or internationally for his 
achievement, vision, and leadership in some field of knowledge or endeavor, is 
invited to give lectures on the Saint Leo College campus. These special guests 
of the College hold seminars for the students and faculty. 

Senior Seminar 

The divisional senior seminar is required of all seniors. Its purpose is to assist 
the student in ordering and integrating the knowledge he has acquired in his 
concentration. Further, the seminar increases the student's awareness of in- 
sights discovered by other students, thereby sharpening his own understand- 
ing. Both through the discussions of problems and issues and through research 
under the leadership of responsible professors, the seminars serve as a basis 
for further inquiry and for clarification of the student's special area of study. 

Flexibility 

Because the academic program is student-centered, it is flexible in order to 
meet individual differences in background and purpose. In general, the pro- 
gram's flexibility provides the student with several areas of academic option: 

Advanced Placement — High school students scoring high on the College 
Board Advanced Placement Examinations may be admitted to the College as 
freshman at the end of their third year of high school. In addition, students 
of special ability or background may waive certain lower level courses and 
replace each with a higher level course. 

Credit by Examination — Full-time students may receive credit in courses by 
successfully completing a comprehensive examination. 

A student may not take more than one-third of the courses required for grad- 
uation by correspondence, credit by examination, or extension. 

Independent Study and Research — All students upon consent of the Division 
Chairman or Institute Director may embark on such a program of indepen- 
dent study and research in their junior and senior years. These courses may be 
repeated for credit. 

This independent study and research may take the form of library research 
through a directed reading program, an action research program in education 
or social sciences, or a formal laboratory research program in the sciences. 



Sophomore Comprehensives. At the end of his sophomore year, each student 
must take a written comprehensive examination. The written examination is 
designed to evaluate the student's achievement during his first two years at 
Saint Leo College. 

Senior Comprehensives. Certain concentrations require the student to take 
the ORE, the NTE, or such other evaluative measure as may be selected by 
the Vice President for Academic Affairs. It is desirable for all students who 
intend to enter a graduate or professional school to take this examination. 



26 



Preparation for Professions 

Saint Leo College is primarily a liberal arts institution. However, basic pre- 
professional courses leading to graduate study or to entrance into professional 
schools are offered in a number of fields: law, medicine, dentistry, osteopa- 
thy, nursing, social work, and others. 

The student who expects to use the liberal arts as a foundation for more spe- 
cialized study at another institution is advised to consult the advisor in his 
special field of interest for a suggested outline of required subjects, and also 
to consult the catalogue of the institution at which he intends to continue his 
studies. Requirements are fairly uniform within a given field, but vary some- 
what among professional and graduate schools. 

Department of Secretarial Science 

The general admission requirements of Saint Leo College must be met by stu- 
dents wishing to enter the Department of Secretarial Science. 

Associate of Arts Degree in Secretarial Science 

This two-year program is designed to develop competent secretaries for 
employment in the modern business world. The program provides not only 
for training in such skills as typing, shorthand, secretarial procedures, use of 
machines, indexing and filing, basic principles of accounting, but also for 
extending the student's background in the liberal arts. 

The student upon the completion of the two year program, if she wishes, may 
continue in the four year program and receive a bachelor of arts degree with a 
concentration in business education. 

Tutorial Services 

Saint Leo College sponsors a Tutorial Service program free of charge for stu- 
dents desiring additional academic instruction. Honor students from the vari- 
ous disciplines tutor the individualized study programs, under the auspices of 
the Director of Tutorial Services. 

Interested students should contact the Director of Tutorial Services for addi- 
tional information. 

The Junior Year Abroad Program 

Participation in the Junior Year Abroad Program is required of all students 
concentrating in German, although French and Spanish concentrators may 
participate at their option and are encouraged to do so. Saint Leo College 
sponsors the Junior Year Abroad program under the auspices of the Central 
College European Studies Program and other programs, which provide study 
of foreign languages and cultures in such institutions as the Universities of 
Vienna, Paris, and Madrid. 

To be eligible the student must ordinarily have attained a 2.50 GPA and must 
have completed satisfactorily two years of college-level courses in the lan- 
guage for which he is applying. He may expect to complete a minimum of 



27 



thirty credit hours during his year abroad - twenty-six in the language and 
four elective credits in a non-language subject. He may thereby fulfill all 
course requirements for a concentration except FLE 431 and FLE 499 I and 
II, which must be taken at Saint Leo College upon his return. He must satisfy 
all other requirements of the College for the Bachelor of Arts Degree. 

Application to study abroad should be made early in the second semester of 
the student's sophomore year, usually not later than the last day in February. 
For further information consult the Foreign Language Coordinator. 

May Session Abroad 

In addition to the Junior Year Abroad Program, Saint Leo College partici- 
pates in another overseas study program during the May Session. In 1969 the 
first of these study trips was made to Europe, with academic credit offered 
for courses in Political Science. In 1970 study trips were made to the Soviet 
Union and to the Bahamas. 




28 




29 



ACADEMIC REGULATIONS 

Registration 



All students are registered for their courses during the registration period 
immediately preceding the fall and spring semesters 



Grading 



Grading System 


A 


Excellent 


B+ 


Very Good 


B 


Good 


C+ 


Above Average 


C 


Average 


D 


Below Average 


F 


Failure 


I 


Incomplete 


WP 


Withdrawn Passing 


WF 


Withdrawn Failing 



4 quality points per credit hour 
3.5 quality points per credit hour 
3 quality points per credit hour 
2.5 quality points per credit hour 
2 quality points per credit hour 
1 quality point per credit hour 
quality points per credit hour 
quality points per credit hour 
quality points per credit hour 
quality points per credit hour 
FA Failure due to excessive Absences quality points per credit hour 

Incomplete work (I) will be counted as failure (F) unless the work is made up 
within three weeks from the regular date of submitting grades. 

Failures and Repeated Courses 

Any course required for graduation which has been failed must be repeated as 

soon as possible. No failure can be removed by correspondence or by 
independent study. 

A course which has been repeated earns the average of the quality points of 
both attempts. 

Grade Changes 

A grade may be changed only by the faculty member administering the 
course. Set changes in grade are permitted only when a computational error 
was made. The student who feels that he has received an improper grade must 
notify the Office of Records immediately upon receipt of the grade. The 
Office of Records will then notify the faculty member of the problem. 

Grade Point Average 

The grade point average (GPA) is determined by dividing the total of the 
quality points earned by the total academic credits attempted. The following 
example illustrates a grade-point average of 2.00 obtained by dividing 30 by 
15. 



30 



Sem. Hours Hours Quality 

Course Hrs. Grade Attempted Earned Points 

FA 121 3 A 3 3 12 

SH111 3 B 3 3 9 

CY 121 3 F 3 

HY121 3 D 3 3 3 

EH 121 3 C 3 3 6 

Credit by Examination 

Full time students may receive credit and quality points by successfully 
completing a comprehensive examination. Students must have prior consent 
of the instructor and pay a $50.00 fee. To receive credit the student must 
achieve a grade of "C" or above. If the student fails, no grade will appear on 
his permanent record but record will be made of the unsuccessful attempt. 

Student Load, Audit, and Class Attendance 

Twelve credits is the minimum course load which a student may take and still 
be considered a full-time student. Students may normally carry 16 to 18 
credits. The permission of the Vice-President for Academic Affairs is required 
for those students who wish to take more than 18 credits. 

When a student is required to take in excess of 20 credits by the Divisional 
Chairman/Institute Director provision may be made to absorb the excess cost 
upon written permission of the Vice-President for Academic Affairs. 

Students may take one course for audit above the normal load with the 
permission of their advisor. Audit students must be regular in attendance and 
must make regular class preparation. No tests or examinations are required. 
No grade or credit is given. Fees are the same for both credit and audit 
courses. 

Upon approval of the Vice-President for Academic Affairs the student may 
take the course for credit. A change from audit to credit will not be 
permitted after the first week of the semester. 

The professor distributes an attendance policy in each of his classes and stu- 
dents are obliged to comply with it. The student's failure to accept this re- 
sponsibility will result in his withdrawal from the course and a grade of 
"FA." 



Drops and Adds 

A student who registers for any course - audit or credit, required or elective - 
is expected to complete it. During the first week of a semester, the student 
may replace a course he has dropped by adding another, providing he meets 
the qualifications for it. The charge to drop one course and add another is 
$10.00. This charge will not be levied when the change is the result of faulty 
counseling. 



31 



Each student has the prerogative of dropping a course until one week after 
the advisory grades have been submitted to the Registrar's Office. A student 
who withdraws during this period will receive a grade of "W". A student who 
withdraws after the deadline will receive a mark of "WP" or "WF" for any 
course which he drops. 

If the withdrawal is not made officially, that is, by filling out a Withdrawal 
from Class Form obtained from the Records Office, the student's record will 
carry an "F" for the course. 

Veterans 

Veterans must maintain a "C" average (2.00) in order to continue to be in 
good standing for Federal Aid. They must also keep in mind any regulations 
regarding changes in concentrations which may affect their standing. 



Scholastic Deficiency 

A student whose cumulative grade point average falls below 2.00 will be 
placed on academic probation beginning with the next session's attendance. 
The College reserves the right to take remedial action by curtailing 
non-academic activities, changing curriculum, repetition of specified courses, 
or lightening course load. 

Students will be suspended from the College if they fail to attain a cumulative 
grade point average of 1 .5 upon the completion of one year of full-time study 
or 30 attempted hours; 1.7 upon the completion of two years of full-time 
study or 60 attempted hours; and 1.9 upon the completion of three years of 
full-time study or 90 attempted hours. 



Withdrawals from the College 

If a student finds it necessary to withdraw from the College for any reason, 
he must do so officially to obtain honorable academic withdrawal. 

Forms are available in the Records Office and the procedure outlined therein 
must be followed. Students who fail to carry out these procedures will receive 
a failure ("F") in all courses for the semester in which they withdraw. In such 
cases, the official withdrawal date for the permanent record will be the last 
day of the semester. 

Since early withdrawal cannot be officially recognized until the student com- 
pletes the procedures for withdrawal, there can be no refund of tuition or 
residence payments until such form is filed and receipted. The effective date 
of withdrawal will be the date the completed form is filed in the Records 
Office. 



Classification of Students and Academic Standing 

Students are classified according to the number of credit hours earned. Listed 
below are the requirements for the respective classifications: 

Freshman - a student who has less than 30 earned credit hours. 
Sophomore - a student who has at least 30 and less than 60 
earned credit hours. 



32 



Junior - a student who has at least 60* and less than 90 earned 

credit hours. 
Senior - a student who has at least 90 earned credit hours. 
Special - non-degree seeking students. 



Degree Requirements 

To earn the degree of Bachelor of Arts the student must satisfy the following 
academic requirements: 

1. Complete a minimum of 120 credits, exclusive of the credits for 
the basic studies in physical education. 

2. Complete the Basic Studies Program. 

3. Complete a minimum of 40 hours at the 300-400 level. 

4. Attain a cumulative grade point average of 2.00. 

5. Complete all the requirements of his division and of his concen- 
tration 

6. Attain a cumulative grade point average of 2.00 in his con- 
centration. 

7. Complete such comprehensive examinations as may be required 
by the College. 

The student must also satisfy the following non-academic requirements: 

1 . Fulfill the residence requirements. 

2. Satisfy all financial obligations. 



Residence Requirements 

Four academic years or eight semesters are ordinarily required to earn the 
bachelor's degree. All students must be in residence (attendance) at least one 
full academic year immediately preceding their graduation and must complete 
a minimum of 30 hours at Saint Leo College. 



Application 



Students must make formal application through the Records Office to 
graduate. A $35.00 fee is required for graduation even if the student chooses 
not to participate in the commencement exercises. In order to provide time 
for the graduation committee to completely research the applicant's record, 
these applications must be submitted by the end of the first semester of the 
school year in which he expects to graduate. 

The College has one formal graduation each year. Graduation is held 
immediately after the completion of the spring semester. 



Honors and Awards 



33 



The Dean's List 

At the end of each semester those students who have earned a semester grade 
point average of 3.25 or better are recognized by placement on the Dean's 
List. Each semester all students on the Dean's List are recognized at a 
scholarship convocation. 



Graduation With Honors 

The degree is conferred: summa cum laude, on students who have a cumula- 
tive index of at least 3.75; magna cum laude, on students who have a cumula- 
tive index of at least 3.5; cum laude on students who have a cumulative index 
of at least 3.25. 

Awards 

The following awards are given to members of the graduating class: 

1. The Clara McDonald Olson Scholarship Award to the graduating 
student earning the highest scholastic average and exhibiting the 
qualities of a true scholar. He must have attended the full four years. 

2. The John I. Leonard General Excellence Award to the member of 
the graduating class who best embodies the qualities of character, 
scholarship, service, leadership, and general excellence for which 
Saint Leo College stands. 

3. The Abbot Marion Bowman Activities Award to the member of the 
graduating class whose Participation and leadership in extra-curricu- 
lar activities have been of the highest order. 



The Floreat Award 

The award may be given at graduation by the Board of Trustees in recogni- 
tion of distinguished benefaction to Saint Leo and to Catholic education in 
the State of Florida. Recipients are: 

1961 Right Reverend Monsignor MacEachen 

1962 Mr. Robert A. Brown 

1963 Mr. Leo N. Hierholzer 

1964 Mrs. R. Hill Boiling 
1967 Mrs. Bertha Evans Brown 



34 



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35 



STUDENT LIFE AND ACTIVITIES 

College has been defined as a place where contemplation in search of meaning 
is the daily exercise, where teachers ponder the deep'questions of life, and 
students learn the science and art of so doing. For all that, College is not just 
a preparation for a future full life; it is an experiment in living, a testing prin- 
ciple, a fulfillment in its own right. Saint Leo College sees as part of its own 
vision for its students the cultivation of religious reverence and duty-, the plea- 
sure of social contact, the stimulation of physical athletic exercise, the 
sharing of fraternal association, the development of courage to make deci- 
sions, the motivation to find the truth of the matter, and the awakening of 
civic pride and involvement. 

In the broad area of student affairs, the College approaches student life as a 
means of fulfilling each student's need to be considered an adequate person 

and a worthy and responsible member of human society. Thus, this need for 
adequacy, worth, and responsibility is provided for in the various student pro- 
grams: the religious program; the government and clubs program; the social 
and athletic programs. 

At the heart of the education process should be the discovery and the devel- 
opment of worthwhile values by which men can live full lives. The study and 
pursuit of these values is not a one-time affair to be relegated to some one 
class or person. Rather, this study and pursuit must be continuous and must 
be a part of all activities which interpret the program. As the world contracts 
and the dimension of time displaces the dimension of space, and the borders 
of ideologies displace the borders of nations, our own pattern of democratic 
life is in jeopardy unless academic excellence is enriched by integrity and the 
perceptive concern which arises through the practice of working with others. 

The College Student Life policies provide reasonable order in the life of the 
college community and serve as a basis for students to live in a free atmo- 
sphere. These policies further provide the opportunity for all members of the 
College to attain their educational objectives by protecting health and safety, 
maintaining and protecting property, and insuring the opportunity for stu- 
dents to participate in college activities outside the classroom. 

The Student Handbook, published at the beginning of each school year, 
serves as a current guide to all students. 



Counseling 

At a college such as Saint Leo, it is a mistake to look for an administrative 
pocket marked "Counseling". No pocket is capacious enough to contain the 



36 



actual counseling, overt and subliminal, organized and informal, which sur- 
rounds the student in his continual associations with the people who teach 
and guide him out of a genuine responsiveness to his needs. This is one of the 
ways in which Saint Leo College is both "small" and larger than many large 
schools. 

As a definite program, the counseling system makes available to any student 
the informed attention of the Academic Vice President, the Director of Men 
and the Director of Women, the Director of Religious Programs, and the fac- 
ulty advisor who helps him plan his course of study. Professors devote then- 
time generously to personal conferences. 

The Counseling Center also provides professional counseling for the student 
to probe more deeply into his personal adjustment as a student, his set of 
values, his interests, his vocational and career potential, and other personal 
matters. 



Religious Life 

Saint Leo College is an institution of higher learning dedicated to Catholic 
ideals. However, the College respects the conscience of each student in his 
religious beliefs and welcomes students of all religious beliefs who wish to 
attend 

Basic to the religiously oriented college is a hierarchy of values arrived at not 
only from the "way things are' 1 but also from the "way things ought to be." 
From this point of view the religious life program of the College blends 
understanding with practice - understanding in knowing Judeo-Christian 
values and practice in living these values. In particular, the student is required 
to take courses in philosophy and theology as part of the general program of 
studies and is encouraged to participate fully in religious exercises as part of 
the Student Affairs Program. 

Chaplains are assigned to residence halls for religious counseling. The student 
is encouraged to "drop-in" and talk with the Chaplain about religious mat- 
ters, spiritual problems, or anything else which the student deems important 
to him. 

Daily and Sunday Masses are scheduled for the convenience of students. 
Similarly, confessions are heard at convenient times and places. Members of 
other faiths are encouraged to attend services in their own churches in nearby 
Dade City. 



Recreational and Athletic Program 

Saint Leo College concerns itself not only with the intellectual and moral 
development of the student, but also with his physical health and recreational 
life. By active participation, the student tends to "reach out of himself" and 
to establish meaningful relationships with other students, faculty members, 
and members of the neighboring communities. The friendly spirit of the Col- 
lege - characteristic of small colleges - is conductive to this involvement with 
others. The recreation facilities at Saint Leo College include the Recreation 
Hall, the McDonald Center, the Student Activities Center (which includes 



37 






eight lanes of bowling, a heated outdoor swimming pool, a two-court gym- 
nasium, a dance studio, a weight room, and locker rooms for men and 
women), the lakefront, a track, tennis and handball courts, ball diamonds, 
basketball courts, a soccer-field, and touch football fields. 

Since athletics makes its own special contribution, Saint Leo College requires 
each student to participate in the Physical Education Program. The purposes 
for required participation are to stimulate vigorous physical exercise, to 
promote physical health, and to encourage student interest in activities which 
have a recreational value and which form a basis for worthwhile use of leisure 
time. 

Further, the College encourages students to apply the knowledge and skills 
acquired in the required program to the various activities of the Intramural 
Program. The Intramural Program is administered through the residence hall 
system, with each residence hall organizing teams to compete within itself 
and among other halls to determine the champion intramural teams. Awards 
and recognition are given to members of the winning teams and points accrue 
to the winning residence hall to determine the outstanding hall on campus. 
Presently the Intramural Program includes football, volleyball, softball, bas- 
ketball, tennis, soccer, golf, billiards, table tennis, and water sports. 

Saint Leo College also has an active and growing intercollegiate program. The 
Intercollegiate Athletic Program is open to all students who are eligible under 
the provisions established by the College and nationally accepted standards. 
At present, the intercollegiate teams at the College compete as independents. 
They are members of the National Collegiate Athletic Association and com- 
pete in the College Division. Sports in which intercollegiate teams are cur- 
rently fielded are soccer, basketball, tennis, baseball, and golf. Among the 
opponents in major sports are Florida State University, the University of 
Florida, Duke University, Rider College, North Texas State College, and the 
University of Maine. 

Student Government Association and Other Organizations 

Through the Student Government Association and other campus organiza- 
tions and through several publications, all students have many opportunities 
to express themselves responsibly, to cultivate their particular interests, and 
to form close relationships. 

All students become members of the Student Government Association upon 
registration. As a segment of the political society in which we live, they are 
given the opportunity to learn and exercise the procedures of the larger 
society through this Association. Consequently, all students have their share 
in shaping their environment and in debating the issues of the day. 

The elected members of the Student Government Association constitute the 
representative branch. It is organized to promote the general welfare of the 
student body and student organizations. It supervises, regulates, and coordi- 
nates student organizations. 



Student Publications 

The College sponsors a bi-weekly student newspaper, The Lion, a yearbook, 
The Golden Legend, and a literary magazine, The Encounter. 



38 



Eligibility Rule 

Officers of the Student organizations must be free from academic or disciplin- 
ary probation. The Department of Athletics abides by the academic standards 
of the National Collegiate Athletic Association. All athletes must be free from 
disciplinary probation. 



Student Health Services 

Saint Leo College maintains a dispensary that is supervised by a registered 
nurse. Minor illnesses and accidents are treated routinely at the dispensary. 
The nurse is in regular attendance daily and a physician is on call. Students 
who require more extensive medical treatment are referred to physicians in 
Dade City. Similarly, students who require bedcare are referred to Jackson 
Memorial Hospital in Dade City. Facilities of the hospital are at the disposal 
of the student who requires emergency treatment. 

All full-time students are covered by health insurance, which provides for 
reimbursement, within specific limits, for surgery and for medical and 
hospital expenses in case of hospitalization due to illness or accident. The 
coverage is in effect twenty-four hours a day, both on and off campus, 
through the academic year and includes school holidays as well as a reason- 
able time at the beginning and end of the school year for travel to and from 
the College. 

All injuries, no matter how minor, should be reported. The students' coopera- 
tion is requested in the completion of all insurance forms; otherwise, students 
may find themselves being charged directly for those services which should 
have been applied to student insurance. 



Residential Living 

All new students are required to live on campus except those living with 
parents or those having special permission to live with close relatives who 
reside within a normal commuting distance. Married students must secure 
off -campus housing. 

Any requests for exceptions to the above regulation should be directed to the 
Dean of Student Affairs. 

Residential Living for Women 

Women at Saint Leo College, with exception of those within commuting dis- 
tance, live in several attractive college housing units: the modern Women's 
New Residence Hall and Marmion Hall are companion dormitories with a 
view of Lake Jovita and the surrounding orange groves; nearby is Priory Hall,a 
part of the Priory. Marmion Cafeteria provides food service for the women's 
dormitories, and Saint Scholastica Hall affords a snack bar and recreation 
room in addition to accommodations for overnight guests. 

All floors are staffed with Student Floor Directors. Assisting the Directors are 
Adult Area Coordinators. Rooms are planned almost entirely for double 
occupancy. Considerable attention is devoted to the selection of roommates 



39 






who are likely to be congenial, and friends or acquaintances who ask to room 
together are given this privilege, when possible. Necessarily, though, the Col- 
lege reserves the right to make final assignments for newly enrolled students. 

Linen and towels are provided weekly to each resident student. Students 
provide their own pillows and blankets. 

Curfew hours for women are determined partially by the student's academic 
standing. In general, curfew hours for women resident students are as follows: 

Sunday - Thursday 1 1 :00 p.m. Everyone 
Friday and Saturday 2.00 a.m. Freshmen 

Sophomores, Juniors, and Seniors not on academic or disciplinary probation 
regulate their own hours. Others have a 2:00 a.m. curfew. Second-Semester 
Sophomores, Juniors, and Seniors with a minimum cumulative grade point 
average of 3.00 regulate their own hours seven days a week. All women 
twenty-one years of age or older regulate their own hours. 

Women students must have permission from their parents to spend weekends 
off campus. Other regulations governing social privileges and conduct are 
explained in the Student Handbook. 



Residential Living for Men 

Men at Saint Leo College, with the exception of those living within com- 
muting distance, live in one of seven housing units: Lee Marvin Hall is a 
modern dormitory named for actor Lee Marvin who attended Saint Leo Pre- 
paratory School; picturesque Saint Leo Hall and Saint Edward Hall; new 
Benoit Hall; Roderick Hall; Saint Charles Hall, a part of the monastery; and 
The Villa, a small, experimental housing unit. McDonald Center provides the 
food service for the men's dormitories. 

All floors are staffed with Student Floor Directors. Assisting the Floor Direc- 
tors are Resident Chaplains. 

Linens and towels are provided weekly to each resident student. Students 
provide their own pillows and blankets. 

Friends and acquaintances who ask to room together are given this privilege if 
possible. Otherwise, considerable attention is devoted to selection of room- 
mates who are congenial. 

There are no hours of curfew for men. Other regulations governing social 
privileges and conduct are explained in the Student Handbook 



Motor Vehicles on Campus 

All students are eligible to register and use motor vehicles as long as they 
comply with the College traffic regulations. Vehicles must be registered with 
the Director of Safety. There will be a registration and parking fee payable to 
the College at the time of registration. Proof of insurance is a prerequisite for 
registration. 



40 



Conduct 

Saint Leo College does not ordinarily act on a student's off -campus activities; 
however, the College does reserve the right to review off-campus behavior and 
may take action when a student uses the name of the College to falsify his 
position, or when he associates the name of the College with a cause not 
approved by the College. 



Any student or student organization whose conduct, on or off campus, is 
damaging to the College's special interests as an academic community may 
expect disciplinary action. 



The Alumni Association 

Established in 1967 by members of the charter class of the four-year College, 
the Alumni Association through its constitution is governed by a Board of 
Directors elected from the membership. Officers of the Association are 
elected annually by and from the Board. All graduates of Saint Leo College 
and recipients Of honorary degrees are members of the Association. Former 
students who completed one year and whose entering' -class has been grad- 
uated are eligible for membership. Including the Junior College graduates of 
1961 through 1964 and the senior College graduates of 1967 through 1970, 
membership in the Alumni Association now approximates 700. An Alumni 
Reunion is annually held on the campus. The Alumni Office, located in Saint 
Francis Hall, maintains the names and addresses of the alumni as well as all 
records of the Association. 




41 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 



Following are descriptions of courses of instruction offered at Saint Leo Col- 
lege. Any courses, however, may be withdrawn from the schedule if insuffi- 
cient enrollment or other factors warrant such action. 

Courses are offered at least once each academic year unless otherwise spec- 
ified in the course description. The calendar year extends from September 1 
to August 15. Some of the more specialized courses may not be offered ex- 
cept during the May Session or during the summer program. 

The number of credits listed opposite the title of each course refers to the 
amount of credit granted each semester for the successful completion of the 
course. In general, each hour of credit implies one hour of classroom work 
per week throughout the semester, except for laboratory courses 

The following chart indicates the concentrations or areas of study within each 
Division or Institute: 

Division or Institute CONCENTRATION or Area of Study 

Business Administration BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION, 

BUSINESS EDUCATION, Accounting, Economics, Finance, 

General Business Administration, 
Management, Marketing, Secretarial Science 

Fine Arts ART, Fine Arts, Humanities, MUSIC, THEATRE 

Language and Literature ENGLISH, Speech, FRENCH, 

GERMAN, SPANISH 

Natural Science and Mathematics BIOLOGY, CHEMISTRY, 

MATHEMATICS, Physics 

Philosophy and Theology PHILOSOPHY, Theology 

Social Science HISTORY, POLITICAL SCIENCE, 

PSYCHOLOGY, SOCIOLOGY 

Institute for Creative Teaching ELEMENTARY EDUCATION, 

PHYSICAL EDUCATION 

The following is a key to the symbols preceding each course number: 



ACC - Accounting, ART - Art, BLY - Biology, CY - Chemistry, ECS - 
Economics, EN - Education, EH - English, FLE - Foreign Language, 
FH -■ French, FIN - Finance, GBA - General Business Administration, 
GN -- German, HY - History, HS - Humanities, MGT - Management, 
MKT - Marketing, MS - Mathematics, MC - Music, PY - Philosophy, PHE 
- Physical Education, PS - Physics, PCL - Political Science, PSY - Psychol- 
ogy, SH - Spanish, SPH - Speech, SSC - Secretarial Science, SY - Sociolo- 
gy, TE - Theatre, TY - Theology. 



42 



THE DIVISION OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 

The Division of Business Administration, in cooperation with all other divi- 
sions, stresses education for the whole man. The Division specializes as need- 
ed to provide a basis for understanding the economic structure of our society. 
Those who enter the business world, the world of products and services, buy- 
ing and selling, must be prepared to support all other segments of our society. 
The Division endeavors to prepare the student to accept his share of this com- 
mitment by placing the emphasis on education in its broader sense rather 
than in job training. 

The Division of Business Administration offers a program leading to the Bach- 
elor of Arts degree which follows the general pattern of the Basic Studies 
program described in the Academic Program. The student is expected to com- 
plete two semesters of Principles of Economics (ECS 121/122) and two 
semesters of Principles of Accounting (ACC 121/122) during the freshman 
and sophomore years. 

BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 

The program in Business Administration is designed as preparation for grad- 
uate study in business, for careers in business and industry, and for admission 
to law school. 

The following additional courses are required to complete the program in 
Business Administration: ECS 225; MKT 231, 433; MGT 241, 242; FIN 325, 
331, or 477; ACC 326, 421; GBA 321, 431, 499; and four other elective 
courses within the Business Administration area. 

BUSINESS EDUCATION 

The Division of Business Administration offers two programs in business 
education: A Bachelor of Arts degree in business education, and An Associate 
of Arts degree in secretarial science. 

The Bachelor of Arts degree in Business Education 

This program is designed to offer professional preparation for teachers, secre- 
taries, and office adminstrators. The following courses are required to com- 
plete the Bachelor of Arts degree in business education: 

Education Courses: Because requirements for certification differ from state 
to state, the Institute for Creative Teaching maintains for students and advp 
sors a file of each state's current requirements. Required education courses 
are: EN 121, 221, 321, 323, 329 (2 credits), 410, and 428. All students must 
take 30 hours. 

Concentration: The following additional courses are required to complete the 
program: ACC 121, 122, ECS 121, 122, GBA 321 , 431, MGT 241, SSC 121, 
122, 123, 124, 221 , 223, 227 and three hours of electives in business courses. 
Students can exempt SSC 121 and/or 123 by making a satisfactory score on a 
proficiency test. 



43 



ACCOUNTING 

ACC 121 PRINCIPLES OF ACCOUNTING I 3 credits 

Basic procedures, including books of original entry, ledger accounts, 
adjusting and closing entries. Three hours per week. 

ACC 122 PRINCIPLES OF ACCOUNTING II 3 credits 

Prerequisite: ACC 121. 

Preparation of financial and operating statements. Elementary account- 
ing concepts and theories. Three hours per week. 

ACC 221 INTERMEDIATE ACCOUNTING I 3 credits 

Prerequisite: ACC 122. 

Principles underlying financial statements, including important ratios, 
capital structure and fund flow analysis. (Offered on demand.) Three 
hours per week. 

ACC 222 INTERMEDIATE ACCOUNTING II 3 credits 

Prerequisite: ACC 221. 

Short and long-term investments and liabilities; interpretation of 

accounting data. (Offered on demand.) Three hours per week. 

ACC 322 ADVANCED ACCOUNTING 3 credits 

Prerequisite: ACC 222. 

Special problems relating to the form of the business organization, con- 
solidations, and insolvencies. (Offered on demand.) Three hours per 
week. 

ACC 326 MANAGERIAL ACCOUNTING 3 credits 

Prerequisites: ACC 122, ECS 122. 

A study of the use by managers of accounting data in planning and 
controlling business operations. (Offered Semester II only.) Three hours 
per week. 

ACC 421 FEDERAL TAXES 3 credits 

Prerequisite: ACC 122. 

A study of the federal income tax structure with emphasis on the tax- 
ation of individuals and corporations. (Offered Semester I only.) Three 
hours per week. 



ECONOMICS 

ECS 121 PRINCIPLES OF MACROECONOMICS 3 credits 

The overview of the dynamics of the American economy, Emphasis on 
the Gross National Product and its components. Three hours per week. 

ECS 122 PRINCIPLES OF MICROECONOMICS 3 credits 

A study of economic analysis concerning the factors at work in the 
marketplace. Three hours per week. 

ECS 225 BUSINESS STATISTICS 3 credits 

Prerequisite: MS 123 or MS 107-108 or permission of advisor. 

An introduction to probability theory and statistics with application to 

business affairs. Sampling and distribution theory; estimation; testing 



44 



hypothesis; analysis of times series; index numbers; accuracy and error 
in the collection and reporting of data. Three hours per week. 

ECS 329 INDEPENDENT STUDY AND RESEARCH 1-3 credits 

Prerequisite: Permission of advisor. 

An honors course designed to meet the needs of the exceptional stu- 
dent who wishes to pursue a particular subject at an advanced level. 
(Offered on demand.) 

ECS 366 MONEY AND BANKING 3 credits 

Prerequisites: ECS 121, 122. 

A nature and function of money and credit in our economy and its 

effect on prices. (Offered Semester I only.) Three hours per week. 

ECS 369 EVOLUTION OF ECONOMIC THOUGHT 3 credits 

Prerequisites: ECS 121, 122. 

A review of the development of economic theory and philosophy from 

its inception to the present. (Offered Semester II only.) Three hours per 

week. 

ECS 423 PUBLIC FINANCE AND TAXATION 3 credits 

Prerequisites: ACC 122; ECS 121, 122. 

A study and economic analysis of governmental expenditures, taxation, 
public debt, and monetary and fiscal policies; a critical examination of 
the use of National Income and Expenditure Accounts in the formula- 
tion of national economic plans. (Offered Semester I only.) Three hours 
per week. 

ECS 424 DEVELOPMENT ECONOMICS 3 credits 

Prerequisites: ACC 122; ECS 121, 122, junior standing. 

Problems, policies, and dynamics of emerging nations. The relevance of 

economic theories of growth and development are examined within the 

context of the social and political environment of underdeveloped 

nations. (Offered on demand.) Three hours per week. (This course may 

also be offered during the May Session as an off-campus (foreign study) 

course.) 

ECS 429 ADVANCED INDEPENDENT STUDY 

AND RESEARCH 1 - 3 credits 

Prerequisite: Permission of advisor. 

An honors course designed to meet the needs of the exceptional stu- 
dent who wishes to pursue a particular subject at an advanced level. 
(Offered on demand.) 

ECS 471 PRICE THEORY 3 credits 

Prerequisites: ECS 121, 122. 

Analysis of competitive and noncompetitive markets in terms of effi- 
ciency and resource use. (Offered Semester II only.) Three hours per 
week. 

FINANCE 

FIN 325 PRINCIPLES OF FINANCE 3 credits 

Prerequisite: ACC 122. 

An introduction to the fundamental concepts, including sources and 
uses of short-term and long-term funds. (Offered Semester I only.) 
Three hours per week. 



45 



FIN 331 PRINCIPLES OF INVESTMENT 3 credits 

Prerequisites: ACC 122; ECS 122; FIN 325 or consent of instructor. 
Survey of the risks and returns of investments made by institutions/ 
individuals. Includes a critical examination of the capital markets as 
well as stock markets. (Offered Semester II only.) Three hours per 
week. 

FIN 477 RISK AND INSURANCE 3 credits 

A survey of problems and coverages in the areas of fire and casualty, 
life and health fields. Includes a study of chance and pooling theory. 
(Offered Semester I only.) Three hours per week. 

GENERAL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 

GBA 251 PRINCIPLES OF ELECTRONIC 3 credits 

DATA PROCESSING 

Prerequisite: Junior standing or consent of the instructor. 
A study of information processing systems (hardware, software, and 
techniques) in sequential and real-time applications, and preparation of 
management systems programs in a current programming language. 
Three hours per week. 

GBA 321 BUSINESS COMMUNICATIONS 3 credits 

Business letters, reports, requests, and other methods of communi- 
cation used in the business world. Three hours per week. 

GBA 431 BUSINESS LAW I 3 credits 

Prerequisite: ACC 122. 

Fundamentals of contracts, sales, commercial paper, and business 
organizations; emphasis on the uniform commercial code and recogni- 
tion of legal problems in the business world. (Offered Semester I only.) 
Three hours per week. 

GBA 432 BUSINESS LAW II 3 credits 

Prerequisite: GBA 431. 

A continuation of GBA 431. (Offered Semester II only.) Three hours 

per week. 

G6A 499 SENIOR SEMINAR IN BUSINESS 3 credits 

Prerequisite: Senior standing. 

Required one semester of the senior year. 

A seminar designed to put the entire course of study in perspective. A 

research paper of significance is usually required. Three hours per week. 

MANAGEMENT 

MGT 241 PRINCIPLES OF MANAGEMENT 3 credits 

Prerequisite: ACC 122. 

The structure and organization of a business and the functions of the 
policy makers in relation to the objectives of the business; emphasis on 
problems of management through analysis of case studies. (Offered 
Semester I only.) Three hours per week. 

MGT 242 MANAGEMENT II 3 credits 

Prerequisite: MGT 241. 

Solution of problems by case studies in the areas of management strat- 
egy, organization and control with special emphasis on behavioral fac- 
tors in organizations. (Offered Semester II only.) Three hours per week. 



46 



MGT 342 SYSTEM ANALYSIS AND DESIGN 3 credits 

Prerequisites: GBA 251; MGT 241. 

The techniques of scientific method approach to management; empha- 
sis on systems analysis. Problems in system design are implemented on 
an IBM 1130 computer. (Offered Semester II only.) Three hours per 
week. 



MARKETING 

MKT 231 BASIC MARKETING 3 credits 

Prerequisites: ECS 121, 122; ACC 122. 

The marketing of goods and services coupled with an integration of 
functional, commodity and institutional approaches from the viewpoint 
of both the consumer and the manager. (Offered Semester I only.) 
Three hours per week. 

MKT 433 MARKETING PROBLEMS 3 credits 

Prerequisite: MKT 231. 

A study of solutions to special marketing problems. Includes case anal- 
yses. (Offered Semester II only.) Three hours per week. 

SECRETARIAL SCIENCE 

The Associate of Arts Degree in Secretarial Science 

This two year program is designed to develop competent secretaries prepared 
for employment in the modern business world. 

The following courses are required to complete the Associate of Arts degree 
in Secretarial Science: 

Basic Studies: PHE 101-102, ECS 121, EH 121, 122, MS 121, one elective in 
philosophy, one elective in fine arts, and either BLY 121, PS 121, or CY 121. 

Concentration: (39 hours) Same as those for the Bachelor of Arts degree in 
business education with the addition of two more hours of electives. This pro- 
gram is designed to allow students to continue at Saint Leo College for an 
additional two years after completing the Associate of Arts degree and receive 
the Bachelor of Arts degree in business education. 

SSC 121 ELEMENTARY SHORTHAND 3 credits 

Gregg Shorthand Diamond Jubilee Theory and Practice. Development 
of reading and writing ability. Four periods per week. 

SSC 122 INTERMEDIATE SHORTHAND 3 credits 

A continuation of SSC 121 with increased practice in dictation and 
transcription skills. Four periods per week. 

SSC 123 ELEMENTARY TYPING 2 credits 

Keyboard mastery drills for speed and accuracy, letters and other busi- 
ness forms. Four periods per week. ($15.00 lab fee.) 

SSC 124 INTERMEDIATE TYPING 2 credits 

A continuation of SSC 123. Four periods per week. ($15.00 lab fee). 

SSC 221 SECRETARIAL PRACTICE 3 credits 

Prerequisites: SSC 223 and SSC 227. 

The study of personal aspects of office problems, secretarial duties, and 



47 



professional and ethical responsibilities. Three periods per week. 

SSC 223 ADVANCED SHORTHAND 3 credits 

Prerequisite: SSC 122 or equivalent. 

Designed to develop further the ability to take dictation and to tran- 
scribe rapidly and accurately. Four periods per week. 

SSC 224 ADVANCED SHORTHAND 3 credits 

Prerequisite: SSC 223. 
Four periods per week. 

SSC 227 ADVANCED TYPING 2 credits 

Prerequisite: SSC 124 or equivalent. 

A continuation of basic and production skills with application of these 

skills to advanced office problems. Four periods per week. ($15.00 lab 

fee.) 

THE DIVISION OF FINE ARTS 

The Division of Fine Arts provides opportunities in creative and aesthetic 
expression for personal enrichment and enjoyment. Courses are offered to 
guide the student into a deeper appreciation for the cultural experiences 
which bring particular satisfaction in his dealings with others. The areas of 
Art, Dance, Film, Music, and Theatre allow the student a wide variety of ac- 
tivities in which he may participate both as a beginner and as an advanced 
student. The realization of self-expression allowed in these courses of study is 
unique to the areas of this division and is essential to the total development 
of the liberal ideal. 

Concentrations in Art, Music, and Theatre are offered by the Division. 

Students who plan to prepare themselves to teach in the fine arts should com- 
plete as electives the professional courses in education as prescribed by the 
Division advisor. 



ART 

A concentration in Art is designed as preparation for graduate work in art, for 
employment in the creative art fields, and for teaching in the elementary 
and/or secondary schools. 

Before graduation, an art concentrator must present an exhibit showing his 
ability to create in various art media. 

Required courses for a concentration in Art: ART 121, 122, 221, 223, 321, 
421, 427, 428, 499, and three other upper division courses chosen on the 
basis of the student's particular area of study to meet the minimum 39 hour 
requirement for the concentration. 

Additional requirements for students preparing to teach are ART 326 and 
327 and additional courses in Education as advised. 

ART 121 VISUAL FUNDAMENTALS I 3 credits 

Introduction to the principles of art through individual creative devel- 
opment, two dimensional design and three dimensional design. Six 
hours of studio per week. 



48 



ART 122 VISUAL FUNDAMENTALS II 3 credits 

Prerequisite: ART 121. 

A continuation of ART 121. Six hours of studio per week. 

ART 221 DRAWING 3 credits 

Prerequisite: ART 121. 

Freehand drawing from landscape, live models, and objects with empha- 
sis on training to see, to understand and to report through drawing. Six 
hours of studio per week. 

ART 223 BEGINNING PAINTING 3 credits 

Prerequisite: ART 121. 

Introduction to studio painting. Investigation and experimentation with 
mixed media with primary emphasis on oil painting. Six hours of studio 
per week. 

ART 224 BEGINNING SCULPTURE 3 credits 

Prerequisite: ART 121. 

Introduction to three-dimensional work in various media with emphasis 
on the development of understanding and effective use of space and 
volume through planes, shapes, positive/negative space relationships, 
and color. Six hours of studio per week. 

ART 225 GRAPHICS 3 credits 

Prerequisite: ART 121. 

Creative processes and projects in relief, intaglio, and planographic tech- 
niques. Six hours of studio per week. 

ART 227 CERAMICS 3 credits 

Prerequisite: ART 121. 

Materials, processes, and techniques involved in producing ceramics by 

handcraft means. Six hours of studio per week. ($25.00 fee) 

ART 321 STUDIO I 2-6 credits 

Prerequisite: Approval of the Divisional Chairman. 
Individual development according to talent in one of the following 
fields: painting, sculpture, graphics, design, ceramics, and crafts. May be 
repeated for credit. Six hours of studio per week ($25.00 - $50.00 fee 
only in ceramics) 

ART 326 ART IN THE ELEMENTARY SCHOOL 3 credits 

Theory and practice of art activities in the elementary school. Under- 
standing of the creative experience in visual arts through workshop 
activity, familiarity with art education theory, and acquaintance with 
designing and presenting meaningful art experiences. Planned for ele- 
mentary education concentrators. Three lectures per week. 

ART 327 ART IN THE SECONDARY SCHOOL 3 credits 

Techniques of teaching art to the secondary school student with 
emphasis on the development of the student's creative work. Included 
are drawing, design, ceramics, and painting. Three lectures per week. 

ART 329 SPECIAL TOPICS 3 credits 

Prerequisite: Approval of the Divisional Chairman. 

Study and research in areas of particular interest to the student. 



49 



ART 421 STUDIO II 2-6 credits 

Prerequisites: ART 321 and approval of the Divisional Chairman. 
Continuation of individual development. May be repeated for credit. 
Six hours of studio per week. ($25.00 - $50.00 fee only in ceramics.) 

ART 427 HISTORY OF ART I 3 credits 

Prerequisite: ART 121 or consent of Divisional Chairman. 

General survey of the cultural development of mankind from earliest 

times through the present, as reflected in painting, architecture, and 

sculpture. 

ART 428 HISTORY OF ART II 3 credits 

Prerequisite: ART 121 or consent of Divisional Chairman. 
Studies in modern art as related to cultural development, beginning 
with the late Nineteenth Century and continuing through the present, 
with emphasis on the contemporary scene. 

ART 429 SPECIAL TOPICS 3 credits 

Prerequisite: Approval of Divisional Chairman. 

Study and research in areas of particular interest to the student. 

ART 499 SENIOR SEMINAR IN ART 3 credits 

Prerequisite: Senior standing. Required of concentrators in Art one 
semester of the senior year. 

The integration of concepts within the field of art and the relation of 
these to other areas of study. One three-hour discussion per week. 



FINE ARTS 



Introductory Fine Arts courses offer a variety of artistic emphases. 

FA 110 DANCE COMPANY 3 credits 

Enrollment by consent of instructor. One three-hour rehearsal per 
week. May be substituted for 300 level PHE course. 

FA 121 INTRODUCTION TO FINE ARTS 3 credits 

An approach to visual, musical and dramatic works of art designed to 
increase the student's understanding and aesthetic pleasure as well as to 
develop acquaintance with techniques and terminology in the arts. 
Three lectures per week. 

FA 123 INTRODUCTION TO FILM 3 credits 

A survey course treating the film as a modern art form, tracing its devel- 
opment from the late Nineteenth Century to the present day. Includes 
mechanics of film production and aesthetic problems which face film 
theoreticians. Two lectures and one workshop per week. 

FA 125 INTRODUCTION TO DANCE 3 credits 

Dance explored as a performing art through the areas of dance tech- 
nique, dance composition and dance history. Three hours of studio per 
week. 



50 



FA 223 CINEMA PRODUCTION 3 credits 

Prerequisite: FA 123. 

Cinema techniques explored in a workshop setting. The student will be 
primarily concerned with the actual filming and editing of motion 
picture sequences. 

FA 225 INTERMEDIATE DANCE 3 credits 

Prerequisite: FA 125. 

A study of composition fundamentals and intermediate dance tech- 
nique. Develops kinesthetic perception of line, movement, rhythm and 
grouping. May be repeated for credit. Three hours per week. 



HUMANITIES 

HS 429 SPECIAL TOPICS 3 credits 

Prerequisite: Senior standing and consent of the Divisional Chairman. 
Advanced reading and study to achieve a synthesis of concepts in areas 
of the humanities selected with regard to the student's need, interest, 
and preparation. 

HS 499 SENIOR SEMINAR IN HUMANITIES 3 credits 

Prerequisite: Senior standing. 

Required of concentrators in Humanities one semester of the senior 

year. The integration of concepts within the field of humanities and the 

relation of these to other areas of study. One three-hour discussion per 

week. 



MUSIC 

A concentration in Music is designed as preparation for graduate work in 
music, for employment in the creative art fields, and for teaching in the ele- 
mentary and/or secondary schools. 

Instruments are available for rental through the Division of Fine Arts. 

Required courses for a concentration in Music: MC 121, 122, 123, 221, 222, 
321 , 322, 323, 324, and 499. MC 1 20, 220, 320, or 420 and participation in 
at least one ensemble is required during each semester in residence. A profi- 
ciency examination in keyboard, sight-singing, and dictation is required for 
graduation. Upper level electives to complete the concentration will be 
chosen on the basis of the student's particular area of study. A minimum of 
38 hours is required for the concentration. 

Additional requirements for students preparing to teach are MC 325, 326, 
327, and additional courses in Education as advised. 

MC 111 ORATORIO CHORUS 1 credit 

Open to all students. May be repeated for credit. One two-hour rehear- 
sal per week. 

MC 112 COLLEGE CHOIR 1 credit 

Enrollment by consent of instructor. May be repeated for credit. Four 
one-hour rehearsals per week. 



51 



MC 113 GLEE CLUB 1 credit 

Open to male students. May be repeated for credit. Four one-hour 
rehearsals per week. 

MC 114 COLLEGIUM MUSICUM 1 credit 

Enrollment by consent of the instructor. May be repeated for credit. 
One two-hour rehearsal per week. 

MC 116 WIND ENSEMBLE 1 credit 

Open to all students. May be repeated for credit. Four one-hour rehear- 
sals per week. 

MC 117 ORCHESTRA 1 credit 

Open to all students. May be repeated for credit. One two-hour rehear- 
sal per week. 

MC 120,220,320,420 PRIVATE INSTRUCTION 1 credit 

Private instruction is offered at each level in the following areas: (b) 
brass; (p) percussion; (r) string; (v) voice; (w) woodwind; (x) keyboard. 
($50.00 fee per semester) (A) or (B) following the course number will 
designate primary (A) or secondary (B) instrument at each level; e.g., 
MC 320 B(w) indicates private study in woodwinds as a second instru- 
ment. May be repeated for credit. One private lesson per week. 

MC 121 MUSIC THEORY I 4 credits 

Teaches the principles of musical structure and style through the draft 
of homophonic writing and visual analysis. Develops fundamental skills 
of musicianship in sight-singing, ear-training, and basic keyboard. Three 
lectures and two drill sessions per week. 

MC 122 MUSIC THEORY II 4 credits 

Prerequisite: MC 121. 

A continuation of MC 121. Three lectures and two drill sessions per 

week. 

MC 123 INTRODUCTION TO MUSIC 3 credits 

An introduction to the art of music, based upon the techniques and 
repertory of music of the world. Three lectures per week. 

MC 221 MUSIC THEORY III 3 credits 

Prerequisite: MC 122. 

Continuation of analysis, craft, and skills. Introduction to Twentieth 

Century compositional idioms. Three lectures and two drill sessions per 

week. 

MC 222 MUSIC THEORY IV 3 credits 

Prerequisite: MC 221. 

Advanced compositional procedures, with emphasis on orchestration 

and original writing. Analysis of large musical forms and introduction 

to contrapuntal techniques. Three lectures and two drill sessions per 

week. 

MC 321 MUSIC HISTORY I 3 credits 

Prerequisite: MC 123 or FA 121. 

The evolution of musical thought and literature from the Middle Ages 

to 1 685. Three lectures per week. Offered in alternate years. 



52 



MC 322 MUSIC HISTORY II 3 credits 

Prerequisite: MC 321. 

The evolution of musical thought and literature from 1685-to the pre- 
sent. Three lectures per week. Offered in alternate years. 

MC 323 CONDUCTING 2 credits 

Prerequisite: MC 121. 

Techniques used in conducting vocal and instrumental ensembles^ Two 

lectures per week. Offered in alternate years. 

MC 324 ADVANCED CONDUCTING 2 credits 

Prerequisite: MC 323. 

A study of advanced conducting and rehearsal techniques. Interpreta- 
tion of score, and a survey of literature. Two lectures per week. Offered 
in alternate years. 

MC 325 MUSIC IN THE ELEMENTARY SCHOOL 3 credits 

Prerequisite: MC 123. 

For music and elementary school concentrators. A study of the objec- 
tives, theories, and techniques of teaching music in the primary and 
intermediate grades, with special attention to repertory and to super- 
vision of creative activities. Directed observation in the elementary 
school will be required. Three lectures per week. 

MC 326 MUSIC IN THE SECONDARY SCHOOL 3 credits 

Prerequisite: MC 222. 

Open only to music concentrators. Junior and senior high school music 
organization and management. A study of the materials and methods 
for musical groups. Directed observation in the secondary school will be 
required. Three lectures per week. Offered in alternate years. 

MC 327 CLASS INSTRUMENTS - b, p, r, v, w, x 1 credit 

Prerequisite: MC 123 or FA 121. 

A comprehensive study of all (b) brass, (p) percussion, (r) string instru- 
ments, (v) voice, (w) woodwind, and (x) keyboard with attention given 
to associated textbooks, pedagogy and performance. Four rehearsals 
per week. 

MC 329 SPECIAL TOPICS 3 credits 

Prerequisite: Consent of Divisional Chairman. 

Reading, advanced analysis, or other projects in accordance with stu- 
dent's needs and capabilities. May be repeated for credit. 

MC 425 CHORAL LITERATURE 2 credits 

Prerequisite: MC 123. 

A study of the larger vocal forms, such as cantata and oratorio. Two 

lectures per week. Offered in alternate years. 

MC 426 SYMPHONIC LITERATURE 2 credits 

Prerequisite: MC 123. 

A study of the development of the symphony and the symphonic 

poem. Two lectures per week. Offered in alternate years. 

MC 429 SPECIAL TOPICS 3 credits 

Prerequisite: Consent of the Divisional Chairman. 

Advanced reading, analysis or projects involving research arid experi- 
mentation. May be repeated for credit. 



53 



MC 499 SENIOR SEMINAR IN MUSIC 3 credits 

Prerequisite: Senior standing. 

Required of music concentrators one semester of the senior year. The 

integration of concepts within the field of music and the relation of 

these to the student's area of study. One three-hour discussion per 

week. 



THEATRE 

A concentration in Theatre is designed as preparation for graduate study in 
theatre, for employment in the creative art fields, and for teaching in the 
secondary schools. 

Students concentrating in Theatre must enroll in College Theatre each semes- 
ter in residence. The Saint Leo College Actors' Workshop offers varied oppor- 
tunities for production. 

Required courses for a concentration in Theatre: TE 121, 123, 221, 421, 
499, and TE/EH 322. At least two courses chosen from the following: TE 
222, 321, 323', 325, and one from the following: TE/EH 422, FA 123, FA 
125, TE/SPH 223, and TE 429. Upper division electives will be chosen to 
meet the minimum 36 hour requirement for the concentration. 

TE 110 COLLEGE THEATRE 1 credit 

Open to all students and townspeople. Participation in play production. 
May be repeated for credit. One three-hour session per week. 

TE 121 INTRODUCTION TO THEATRE ARTS 3 credits 

Investigates the imaginative processes involved in creating theatre. 
Emphasizes dramatic literature in performance and examines roles of 
playwright, director, actor, designer, and theatre architect. Three lec- 
tures per week. 

TE 123 TECHNICAL THEATRE 3 credits 

The theory and practice of building, painting, rigging, and shifting 
scenery; construction and use of properties; basic makeup; familiarizes 
student with lighting instruments and their control. Three lectures per 
week. 

TE 221 PERFORMANCE I 4 credits 

Prerequisite: TE 121 or consent of instructor. 

A workshop in the fundamentals of acting in which the beginning steps 

in creating a role are introduced. Exercises in voice production and 

stage movement are important features of the program. Six hours per 

week. 

TE 222 PERFORMANCE II 4 credits 

Prerequisite: TE 221. 

A workshop in the problems of acting which continues work begun in 
TE 221 and introduces techniques of characterization and style. Six 
hours per week. 

TE/SPH 223 PHONETICS AND ARTICULATION 3 credits 

(See SPH 223) 

Study of the scientific bases of voice and speech; analysis of the pho- 
netic structure of our speech and language through application of the 
International Phonetic Alphabet. Three hours per week. 



54 



TE 321 DIRECTING 3 credits 

Prerequisite: TE 121. 

Development of the director's role from the first reading of a script to 
its actual performance. Each student will direct one short play for per- 
formance in the College Theatre. Three lectures per week. 

TE/EH 322 WORLD DRAMA 3 credits 

(See EH 322) 
Prerequisite: EH 122 

A survey of representative plays in the historical development of dra- 
matic literature from Aeschylus to Samuel Beckett. Three hours per 
week. 

TE 323 TECHNICAL PRODUCTION 4 credits 

Prerequisites: TE 121 and 123. 

Advanced technical practice in scenery, lighting and design. Students 

will design scenery and lighting, and serve as technical directors for 

College Theatre productions. (Required laboratory) Four sessions per 

week. 

TE 325 PLAYWRITING 3 credits 

Prerequisite: TE 121 or consent of instructor. 

Fundamentals of writing for the stage. The student playwright is guided 
from initial jdea to completed manuscript. Emphasis on characteriza- 
tion, dialogue, and plotting. Selected plays will be produced by the 
College Theatre. Three lectures per week. 

TE 329 SPECIAL TOPICS 3 credits 

Prerequisite: Approval of Divisional Chairman. 

Designed to enable the student to pursue through directed study and 

research a subject related to his particular interest. 

TE 421 HISTORY OF THEATRE 3 credits 

Prerequisite: TE 121. 

A survey of the chief periods of theatrical history from pre-classical 

times to the present. Three lectures per week. 

TE/EH 422 SHAKESPEARE 3 credits 

(See EH 422) 
Prerequisite: EH 122. 

Selected comedies, chronicle plays, and tragedies, with consideration of 
Shakespeare's dramaturgical development. Three hours per week. 

TE 429 SPECIAL TOPICS 3 credits 

Prerequisite: Approval of Divisional Chairman. 

Designed to enable the student to pursue through independent study 

and research a subject related to his particular interest. 

TE 499 SENIOR SEMINAR IN THEATRE 3 credits 

Prerequisite: Senior standing. 

Required of theatre concentrators one semester of the senior year. The 
integration of concepts within the field of theatre and the relation of 
these to other areas of study. One three-hour discussion per week. 



55 



THE DIVISION OF LANGUAGE AND LITERATURE 

The Division of Language and Literature provides the student the basic com- 
munication skills necessary for successful completion of his college career. In 
composition, the student learns to read intelligently, to think logically, and to 
write effectively; in modern foreign languages, he acquires a proficiency in 
speaking another language and at the same time is led to a greater knowledge 
of the nature of language in general; in literature, he studies the uses of lan- 
guage as art. 

The Division offers concentrations in English, French, Spanish, and German. 

Students who plan to teach the above subjects in secondary school should 
complete as electives the professional courses in Education prescribed by the 
Institute for Creative Teaching in addition to all the courses required in their 
concentrations. 



ENGLISH 

Required courses for a concentration in English: EH 221, 222, 223, 224, 422, 
and 499. In addition the concentrator must elect, in consultation with his 
advisor, the following courses: one from EH 419 or 420; two from EH 321, 
425, 427, or 431; and three other English courses to meet the minimum 36 
hour requirement for the concentration. 

Students who plan to teach English in secondary schools must complete the 
following courses: EH 221, 222, 223, 224, 323, 326, 422, 433, 499, SPH 
221, upper division electives to meet the minimum 36 hour requirement, and 
additional courses in Education as advised. 

EH 121 COMPOSITION 3 credits 

Required of all freshmen. The techniques of effective writing, logical 
thinking, and intelligent reading, with special emphasis on expository 
writing. Three hours per week. 

EH 122 COMPOSITION AND LITERATURE 3 credits 

Prerequisite: EH 121. 

Required of all freshmen. A continuation of EH 121. Expository writ- 
ing based on analytical study of literary genres. Three hours per week. 

EH 221 SURVEY OF ENGLISH LITERATURE I 3 credits 

Prerequisite: EH 122. 

An introduction to the poetry, prose, and drama of English literature 

from the beginnings through the Restoration. Three hours per week. 

EH 222 SURVEY OF ENGLISH LITERATURE II 3 credits 

Prerequisite: EH 122. 

An introduction to English literature from the Eighteenth Century to 

World War I. Three hours per week. 

EH 223 SURVEY OF AMERICAN LITERATURE I 3 credits 

Prerequisite: EH 122. 

An introduction to American literature from the colonial writers 
through the romantics: Edwards, Taylor, Hawthorne, Poe, Emerson, 
Thoreau, Melville. Three hours per week. 



56 



EH 224 SURVEY OF AMERICAN LITERATURE II 3 credits 

Prerequisite: EH 122. 

An introduction to American literature from the realists to the writers 
of the 'Twenties and after: Whitman and Twain through O'Neill and 
Hemingway. Three hours per week. 

EH 225 WORLD LITERATURE I 3 credits 

Prerequisite: EH 122. 

A survey of the literature of the Western World in translation, from the 

ancient through the Renaissance periods. Three hours per week. 

EH 226 WORLD LITERATURE II 3 credits 

Prerequisite: EH 122. 

A survey of the literature of the Western World in translation, including 
the neoclassical, romantic, realistic, naturalistic, and modern periods. 
Three hours per week. 

EH 227 BASIC JOURNALISTIC WRITING 3 credits 

Prerequisite: EH 122. 

Basic theories and procedures in collecting and writing news. (Course 

offered on demand only.) Three hours per week. 

EH 321 THE ENGLISH NOVEL 3 credits 

Prerequisite: EH 122. 

The historical development of the English novel of the Eighteenth and 
Nineteenth Centuries. (Offered 1971 and alternate years.) Three hours 
per week. 

EH 322 WORLD DRAMA 3 credits 

Prerequisite: EH 122. 

A survey of representative plays in the historical development of dra- 
matic literature from Aeschylus to Samuel Beckett. Three hours per 
week. 

EH 323 HISTORY AND STRUCTURE OF THE 

ENGLISH LANGUAGE 3 credits 

Prerequisite: EH 122. 

An eclectic approach to the history of the English language through 
discussions of phonology, morphology, syntax, and vocabulary of the 
language. (Offered 1971 and alternate years.) Three hours per week. 

EH 325 FICTION WRITING 3 credits 

Prerequisite: EH 122. 

Technique in writing fiction: plot, characterization, point of view, set- 
ting, and style. Evaluation of student writing in individual conferences. 
May be taken twice for credit. Three hours per week. 

EH 326 ADVANCED COMPOSITION 3 credits 

Prerequisite: EH 122. 

Advanced prose composition in description, narration, argumentation, 
and exposition, with emphasis on rhetorical and stylistic techniques. 
Three hours per week. 

EH 417 STUDIES IN AMERICAN LITERATURE 3 credits 

Prerequisite: EH 223 or 224. 

Specialized study in American literature: selected literary figures or 

period. (Offered 1972 and alternate years.) Three hours per week. 



57 



EH 419 ENGLISH DRAMA 3 credits 

Prerequisite: EH 221 or 222. 

A survey of exemplary texts from Medieval, Renaissance (exclusive of 
Shakespeare), Restoration, and Eighteenth and Nineteenth Century 
English drama. Three hours per week. 

EH 420 MEDIEVAL ENGLISH LITERATURE 3 credits 

Prerequisite: EH 221. 

A study of Old and Middle English writers, with emphasis on Chaucer. 

(Offered 1971 and alternate years.) Three hours per week. 

EH 422 SHAKESPEARE 3 credits 

Prerequisite: EH 122,. 

Selected sonnets, comedies, histories, and tragedies, with consideration 

of Shakespeare's dramaturgical development. Three hours per week. 

EH 425 SEVENTEENTH-CENTURY ENGLISH LITERATURE 3 credits 

Prerequisite: EH 221:. 

A study of English literature from Donne to Milton and Bacon to 
Hobbes, including Cavaliers, Puritans, and Divines. (Offered 1971 and 
alternate years.) Three hours per week. 

EH 427 RESTORATION AND EIGHTEENTH-CENTURY 

ENGLISH LITERATURE 3 credits 

Prerequisite: EH 221 and 222. 

A study of the literature of the Neoclassical period, with emphasis on 
Dryden, Swift, Pope, Addison and Steele, Johnson, and Boswell. (Of- 
fered 1972 and alternate yeans.) Three hours per week. 

EH 429 INDIVIDUAL STUDY 3 credits 

Prerequisite: Approval of Division Chairman. 

Directed study in special projects in linguistics, literature, or criticism. 

EH 431 NINETEENTH-CENTURY ENGLISH LITERATURE 3 credits 

Prerequisite: EH 221 or 222. 

A study of the poetry and prose of the Romantic and Victorian eras 
exclusive of the novel. (Offered 1972, and alternate years.) Three hours 
per week. 

EH 433 MODERN BRITISH AND AMERICAN WRITERS 3 credits 

Prerequisite: EH 221, 222, 223, or 224. 

A study of selected poetry and fiction by British and American writers 

since 1900. (Offered 1972 and alternate years.) Three hours per week. 

EH 435 LITERARY CRITICISM 3 credits 

Prerequisite: Approval of instructor. 

Principles and methods of literary criticism; application of critical 
methods to works by representative writers. (Offered 1972 and alter- 
nate years.) Three hours per week. 

EH 499 SENIOR SEMINAR 3 credits 

Prerequisite: Senior standing. 

Required of concentrators in English one semester of the senior year. 
Specialized study in English or American literature: selected literary 
figure or period. One three-hour discussion per week. 



58 



SPEECH 

The Division of Language and Literature offers a series of speech courses for 
the student who wishes training in public address or phonetics and articula- 
tion. 

SPH 221 FUNDAMENTALS OF SPEECH 3 credits 

Study of the fundamental principles of public speaking, including prac- 
tice in the preparation and delivery of extemporaneous speeches. Three 
hours per week. 

SPH 223 PHONETICS AND ARTICULATION 3 credits 

Study of the scientific bases of voice and speech; analysis of the pho- 
netic structure of our speech and language through application of the 
International Phonetic Alphabet. Three hours per week. 

SPH 321 INTRODUCTION TO SPEECH DISORDERS 3 credits 

Prerequisite: SPH 223. 

The nature, causes, and treatment of certain speech disorders, such as 
defective articulation, stuttering, cleft, palate, and voice disorders. 
(Course offered on demand only.) Three hours per week. 

SPH 322 ADVANCED PUBLIC ADDRESS 3 credits 

Prerequisite: SPH 221. 

Study and practice in the preparation and presentation of various pub- 
lic address forms: impromptu, extemporaneous, memory, and manu- 
script reading. (Course offered on demand only.) Three hours per week. 

SPH 331 DISCUSSION AND DEBATE 3 credits 

The study and application of reasoning and evidence as used in public 
deliberation. Three hours per week. 

FOREIGN LANGUAGES 

Students who concentrate in German must pursue a program of study in an 
approved college or university abroad. Students who concentrate in French or 
Spanish may study abroad or may develop an on-campus program in consulta- 
tion with the Foreign Language Coordinator. 

Required courses for a concentration in a foreign language in the Junior Year 
Abroad program ordinarily will include two years of pre-college studies in the 
foreign language, two years of college foreign language courses before the 
junior year, a minimum of 30 hours in a foreign college or university during 
the junior year, FLE 43 1 , and FLE 499 I and II. 

Required courses for an on-campus concentration ordinarily will include two 
years of pre-college studies in the foreign language, FLE 211-212, 223-224, 
325-326, 324 (French only), 319 (Spanish only), 328, 333-334, 431, and 499 
I and II. 

FLE 111-112 ELEMENTARY FOREIGN LANGUAGE 

(French, German, Spanish) 3 credits each 

A course designed to develop the basic skills of aural comprehension, 
speaking, reading, and writing. Three hours of class and a minimum of 
two hours of laboratory per week. 



59 



FLE 211-212 INTERMEDIATE FOREIGN LANGUAGE 

(French, German, Spanish) 3 credits each 

A course designed to enable the student to communicate directly with a 
native speaker, to read with direct understanding, and to acquire basic 
knowledge t about the culture of the respective country and its people. 
Three hours per week. 

FLE 223-224 COMPOSITION AND CONVERSATION 

(French, German, Spanish) 3 credits each 

Prerequisite: FLE 212. 

A course in vocabulary expansion, self-expression through writing, and 

a wide range of idiomatic usage in conversation. Three hours per week. 

FLE 319 ADVANCED GRAMMAR (Spanish) 2 credits 

Prerequisite: FLE 224. 

A study of the parts of speech, syntax, the function of the verb, and 

idiomatic usage in Spanish. Two hours per week. 

FLE 324 PHONETICS (French) 2 credits 

Prerequisite: FLE 212. 

An analysis of modern speech patterns using phonetic symbology and 

drills to improve fluency and aural acuity. Two hours per week. 

FLE 325-326 LITERATURE SURVEY (French, Spanish) 3 credits each 

Prerequisite: FLE 212 or waiver. 

This course traces the processes of literary evolution from the Middle 
Ages to the present as related to historical, social, and cultural develop- 
ments. Three hours per week. 

FLE 328 CULTURAL TRAVEL AND STUDY 

(French, Spanish) 2-6 credits 

Prerequisite: Approval of the Foreign Language Coordinator. 
A student wishing to avail himself of the numerous summer study pro- 
grams offered in foreign countries may make arrangements himself for 
such study. If the program is of four weeks' duration or longer, and if 
advance approval is obtained, course credit at the College may be 
granted under this heading. 

FLE 329 INDIVIDUAL STUDY (French, German, Spanish) 1-3 credits 

Prerequisite: Approval of the Foreign Language Coordinator. 
Directed study in special projects. 

FLE 333-334 READINGS IN CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE 

(French, Spanish) 3 credits each 

Prerequisite: FLE 326. 

A course designed to acquaint students with selected writings of the 
Twentieth Century. An understanding of textual criticism is developed. 
Three hours per week. 

FLE 335-336 SURVEY OF SPANISH-AMERICAN 

LITERATURE 3 credits each 

Prerequisite: SH 212 or waiver. 

A study of selected works from the Seventeenth to the Twentieth Cen- 
tury. 



60 



FLE 431 ADVANCED LITERATURE SURVEY 

(French, German, Spanish) 3 credits each 

Prerequisite: FLE 334 or junior year abroad. 

Based on the method of textual analysis, the course emphasizes a spe- 
cific literary period or genre. Three hours per week. 

FLE 499 I and II SENIOR SEMINAR 

(French, German, Spanish) 3 credits each 

Prerequisite: FLE 431 or junior year abroad. 

Critical examination of assimilated material coordinating literary trends 
with the motivating forces behind them — thus a synthetic approach 
to the humanities through literature. Three hours per week. 

THE DIVISION OF NATURAL SCIENCE AND MATHEMATICS 



The Division of Natural Science and Mathematics deals with the nature of the 
universe about us and the methods employed to discover the laws underlying 
the observed phenomena. 

Through the pursuit of biology, chemistry, physics, and mathematics the stu- 
dent has the opportunity to learn and to appreciate the aims and attitudes of 
the scientist, to know something of the philosophy and techniques of so- 
called scientific method, to grasp the concepts underlying much of science, to 
set the stage for speculation on the philosophy of science, and possibly to stir 
his drive for fulfillment through a life dedicated to scientific pursuit. 

Concentrations in Biology, Chemistry, and Mathematics are offered by the 
Division. Students who plan to teach in the secondary school in the above 
areas should complete as electives the professional courses in Education pre- 
scribed by the Institute for Creative Teaching in addition to all the courses 
required in their concentrations. 



Pre-Professional Program 

Courses applicable to pre-medical, pre-dental, pre-veterinary science, pre- 
pharmacy, pre-medical technology, and pre-engineering are designed for stu- 
aents interested in beginning their, course work at Saint Leo College. Varia- 
tions in course requirements for these areas are made to conform to the 
requirements of the college the student will attend to complete his academic 
work. For guidance within these pre-professional programs, students should 
confer with the Divisional Chairman. 



BIOLOGY 

A concentration in Biology is designed as preparation for graduate study, 
teaching the secondary schools, and for professional schools of medicine, 
dentistry, veterinary science, nursing, medical technology, and physical ther- 
apy. 

A minimum of 36 credits in biology is required for a concentration. This 
must include BLY 123, 221, 222, 223. Also required are CY 123, 124, 221, 
and 222; MS 1 23 and 1 24. PS 1 23 and 1 24 are recommended. 



61 



BLY 121 INTRODUCTION TO BIOLOGY 3 credits 

For non-science concentrators only. A basic, general, and coordinated 
study of the world of living things of which man himself is the most 
important. The course is divided into four general topics: the cell, the 
structure and function of the human body, a survey of the plant and 
animal kingdoms;, and the principles of inheritance. Four hours per 
week. 

BLY 123 CELL BIOLOGY 4 credits 

A study of the anatomy and physiology 'of the plant and animal cell, 
including all the life processes, cell division, cell differentiation, and the 
development of the primary embryonic tissues: Three lectures and one 
three-hour laboratory per week. 

BLY 220 HUMAN ANATOMY AND PHYIOLOGY 3 credits 

Required of students concentrating in physical education. Functional 
anatomy and physiology with emphasis on the central nervous, muscu- 
lar, appendicular, and endocrine systems. Three lectures per week. 

BLY 221 INVERTEBRATE ZOOLOGY 4 credits 

Prerequisite: BLY 123. 

A study of the main characters of the principal invertebrate phyla, in- 
cluding general trends in the development of body systems, behavior, 
and adaptations to particular modes of life. Three lectures and one 
three-hour laboratory per week. 

BLY 222 VERTEBRATE ZOOLOGY 4 credits 

A study of the structure, physiology, reproduction, ecology, behavior, 
and evolution of the vertebrates. Three lectures and one three-hour lab- 
oratory per week. 

BLY 223 BOTANY 4 credits 

Survey of the plant kingdom. Study of the structure, life processes, re- 
production and evolutionary relationships of plants. Local flora serve as 
a basis for taxonomic studies. Three lectures and one three-hour labora- 
tory per week. 

BLY 321 VERTEBRATE EMBRYOLOGY 4 credits 

Prerequisite: BLY 123. 

Elective for biology concentrators. Development of the frog, the chick- 
en, and the pig. Three lectures and one three-hour laboratory per week. 

BLY 322 COMPARATIVE VERTEBRATE ANATOMY 4 credits 

Prerequisite: BLY 123. 

Elective for biology concentrators. Comparative study of the vertebrate 
groups with particular reference to the phylogenetic development. 
Three lectures and one three-hour laboratory per week. 

BLY 323 INTRODUCTION TO TAXONOMY 4 credits 

Prerequisite: BL Y 223. 

A study of the principle families of the angiosperms including phyto- 
graphy and its terminology, the construction and use of keys, nomen- 
clature, concepts of taxa, and a survey of taxonomic literature. Three 
lectures and one three-hour laboratory per week. 



62 



BLY 325 BIOECOLOGY 3 credits 

Prerequisite: BLY 121 or BLY 123. 

Recommended as an elective for students concentrating in Elementary 
Education. Principles of ecology based on field studies of local plant 
and animal communities. Three lectures per week. 

BLY 329 INDEPENDENT STUDY AND RESEARCH 1 - 3 credits 

Prerequisite: Department approval. 
Independent study and undergraduate research. 

BLY 420 GENERAL PHYSIOLOGY 4 credits 

Prerequisites: 12 hours of Biology: CY 222. 

The physiochemical laws applied to organisms. A study of external and 
internal changes in environment that affect metabolism, irritability, and 
reproduction of organisms. Three lectures and one three-hour labora- 
tory per week. 

BLY 421 MODERN GENETICS 4 credits 

Prerequisites: BLY 123 and CY 222 or with the consent of the instruc- 
tor. 

Principles of genetics (evolutionary and biochemical) dealing with the 
molecular nature of heredity determinants. Three lectures and one 
three-hour laboratory per week. 

BLY 423 BIOCHEMISTRY 4 credits 

Prerequisite: CY 222. 

A fundamental course in biochemistry, including carbohydrates, lipids, 
proteins, enzymes, hormones, and certain metabolic intermediates. 
Three lectures and one three-hour laboratory per week. 

BLY 425 BACTERIOLOGY 4 credits 

Prerequisite. BL Y 123 and CY 124. 

A study of the non-pathogenic bacteria, their structure, physiology and 

metabolism. Three lectures and one three-hour laboratory per week. 

BLY 429 ADVANCED INDEPENDENT STUDY 1 - 3 credits 

AND RESEARCH 

Prerequisite: Departmental approval. 

BLY 499 SENIOR SEMINAR IN BIOLOGY 1 credit 

Prerequisite: senior standing. 

CHEMISTRY 

A concentration in Chemistry is designed as preparation for graduate study, 
for teaching in the secondary schools, for work in industrial laboratories, for 
civil service positions and other related fields. 

Required courses for a concentration in Chemistry: CY 123, 124, 221, 222, 
321, 421, 422, 424, and one other course in chemistry; BLY 121 or 123; MS 
123, 124, 221, and 222; PS 123 and 124. 

These courses constitute a minimum requirement for a concentration in 
Chemistry. It is recommended that this program be strengthened with two or 
more additional courses in chemistry. 



63 



CY 121 INTRODUCTION TO CHEMISTRY 3 credits 

An introduction to the fundamentals of chemistry. A terminal course 
for non-science majors. Four hours per week. 

CY 123 GENERAL CHEMISTRY I 4 credits 

Required of students concentrating in science. A beginning course in 
chemistry. Fundamental laws and theories, including atomic and mole- 
cular structure. The periodic law, gas laws, mass and energy relation- 
ships, chemical equilibrium and other topics. Three lectures and one 
three-hour discussion-laboratory per week. 

CY 124 GENERAL CHEMISTRY II 4 credits 

Prerequisite: CY 123. 

A continuation of general chemistry with qualitative analysis. Three lec- 
tures and one three-hour discussion-laboratory per week. 

CY 221 ORGANIC CHEMISTRY I 4 credits 

Prerequisite: CY 124. 

Fundamental principles of organic chemistry. Laboratory includes qual- 
itative analysis. Three lectures and one four-hour laboratory per week. 

CY 222 ORGANIC CHEMISTRY II 4 credits 

Prerequisite: CY 221. 

Continuation of CY 221. Three lectures and one four-hour laboratory 

per week. 

CY 321 QUANTITATIVE ANALYSIS 4 credits 

Prerequisites: CY 124 and MS 124. 

Theoretical principles and laboratory techniques involved in quantita- 
tive determination of inorganic compounds. Determinations include 
acidimetry, alkalimetry, oxidemetry, iodimetry, and gravimetry. Two 
lectures and two three-hour laboratories per week. 

CY 323 ELEMENTARY PHYSICAL CHEMISTRY 4 credits 

Prerequisites: CY 124 and MS 124. 

Not for students concentrating in chemistry. Designed specifically for 
premedical and predental students. A general course in physical chemis- 
try. Three lectures and one three-hour discussion-laboratory per weeA. 

CY 329 INDEPENDENT STUDY AND RESEARCH 1 - 3 credits 

Prerequisite: Departmental Approval. 
Independent study and undergraduate research. 

CY 421 PHYSICAL CHEMISTRY I 4 credits 

Prerequisites: CY 321, PS 124, and MS 222. 

Properties of gases, kinetic theory, elementary thermodynamics, solu- 
tions, colloids, electrochemistry, homogeneous and heterogeneous equi- 
libria. Three lectures and one four-hour laboratory per week. 

CY 422 PHYSICAL CHEMISTRY II 4 credits 

Prerequisite: CY 421. 

Continuation of CY 421. Three lectures and one four-hour laboratory 

per week. 

CY 423 BIOCHEMISTRY 4 credits 

Prerequisite: CY 222. 

A fundamental course in biochemistry, including carbohydrates, lipids, 
proteins, enzymes, hormones, and certain metabolic intermediates. 
Three lectures and one four-hour laboratory per week. 



64 



CY 424 INORGANIC CHEMISTRY 3 credits 

Prerequisite : CY 422. 

The study of modern theories of atomic and molecular structure, inor- 
ganic reaction jnechanisms, complexes and inorganic stereo-chemistry. 
Three lectures per week. 

CY 425 INSTRUMENTAL ANALYSIS 3 credits 

Prerequisite: CY 421. 

Theory and practice of instrumental methods of chemical analysis. Two 

lectures and one three-hour laboratory per week. 

CY 429 ADVANCED INDEPENDENT STUDY 1 - 3 credits 

AND RESEARCH 

Prerequisite: Departmental approval. 

CY 499 SENIOR SEMINAR IN CHEMISTRY 1 credit 

Prerequisite: Senior standing. 

MATHEMATICS 

A concentration in Mathematics is designed as preparation for graduate study, 
for teaching in the secondary schools, for civil service, industry, and many 
other fields which make considerable use of mathematics. 

Required courses for a concentration in Mathematics: MS 123, 124, 221, 
222, 223, 325, 326, 423, 424, 431, 432; PS 123 and 124 or PS 221 and 222. 

Required courses for a concentration in Mathematics-Education: MS 123, 
124, 220, 221, 222, 223, 325, 326; PS 123 and 124 or PS 221 and 222; EN 
221,321,323, and 410. 



MS 107-108 COLLEGE ALGEBRA AND 

INTRODUCTORY TRIGONOMETRY I AND II 2 credits each 

Basic concepts and fundamentals of arithmetic, algebra, and trigono- 
metry for students with inadequate preparation for MS 123. The course 
content is the same as that of MS 123, but it is offered over two semes- 
ters. MS 107-108 constitute a unified sequence; therefore, 108 should 
be taken in the semester immediately following 107. Two lectures and 
two discussion periods per week. 

MS 121 FUNDAMENTAL CONCEPTS OF MATHEMATICS 3 credits 

An intuitive introduction to how, on what basis, and by what method 
mathematics is built. The concepts of set, function, and vector are used 
to develop and unify the topics of set theory, number system, algebra, 
Cartesian graphs, numeration, linear inequalities, scientific notation and 
the logarithmic, quadratic, trigonometric, and probability functions. In 
one section special emphasis will be given to topics of special value to 
elementary teachers. Three lectures and one discussion period per week. 



MS 123 COLLEGE ALGEBRA AND INTRODUCTORY 

TRIGONOMETRY 4 credits 

Prerequisite: adequate score on MS 123 placement test. 

A study of the basic concepts and fundamentals of arithmetic, algebra, 

and trigonometry. Four hours per week. 



65 



MS 124 INTRODUCTORY CALCULUS WITH TRIGONOMETRY 

AND ANALYTIC GEOMETRY 4 credits 

Prerequisite: MS 123 or MS 107-108. 

Trigonometric functions of real numbers, trigonometric identities, 
plane analytic geometry, limits, derivatives, and integration of algebraic 
functions are considered with applications. Four lectures and one dis- 
cussion period per week. 

MS 125 INTRODUCTION TO COMPUTERS 3 credits 

Prerequisite: Adequate score on aptitude test. 

Algorithms, flow charts, and FORTRAN programming developed 
through sets of linear inequalities. Elementary logic, Booleam algebra, 
and switching circuits are considered. Three lectures per week. 

MS 220 COLLEGE GEOMETRY 3 credits 

Prerequisite: MS 123. 

A study of Euclidean geometry with emphasis upon the modern devel- 
opment of basic concepts. Three lectures and one discussion period per 
week. 

MS 221 CALCULUS AND ANALYTIC GEOMETRY I 4 credits 

Prerequisite: MS 124. 

Derivatives and integration of trigonometric, exponential, logarithmic, 
and hyperbolic functions are established. Integration techniques, impro- 
per integrals, the chief theorems underlying the calculus, arc length, 
curvature, paremetric representations, and differentials are considered 
with applications. Four lectures and one discussion period per week. 

MS 222 CALCULUS AND ANALYTIC GEOMETRY II 4 credits 

Prerequisite: MS 221. 

A study of polar coordinates, analytic geometry and vectors in 3-space, 
partial differentiation, and multiple integrals is made with applications 
to physics, geometry, and related fields in wide variety. Four lectures 
and one discussion period per week. 

MS 223 INFINITE SERIES AND INTRODUCTORY 

DIFFERENTIAL EQUATIONS 4 credits 

Prerequisite: MS 222. 

A study of infinite series and sequences, and differential equations in- 
cluding ordinary linear equations of first, second, and higher order, and 
series solutions for linear equations at ordinary and regular singular 
points is undertaken. Four lectures and one discussion period per week. 

MS 325 INTRODUCTION TO MODERN ALGEBRA 3 credits 

Prerequisite: MS 221. 

A study of mathematical systems, integers, rings, fields, integral do- 
mains, groups, polynomials, isomorphism, and homomorphism with 
emphasis on the techniques of rigorous proof. Three lectures and one 
discussion period per week. 

MS 326 INTRODUCTION TO LINEAR ALGEBRA 3 credits 

Prerequisite: MS 325. 

Determinants, matrix algebra, rank and equivalence, linear equations 
and linear dependence, vector spaces and linear transformations, and 
the characteristic equation of a matrix are studied in themselves and in 
order that their applications in special fields of interest may be seen. 
Three lectures and one discussion period per week. 



66 



MS 423 ADVANCED CALCULUS I 3 credits 

Co-requisite: MS 223. 

The real number system, extensions of law of the mean, functions of 
several variables, partial differentiation, implicit-function theorems, 
transformations and mappings, vector fields, and multiple integrals are 
considered from a rigorous approach. Three lectures and one discussion 
period per week. 

MS 424 ADVANCED CALCULUS II 3 credits 

Prerequisite: MS 423. 

A study of curves and surfaces, line and surface integrals, point set the- 
ory, fundamental theorems on continuous functions, the theory of inte- 
gration, infinite series, improper integrals, and complex functions. 
Three lectures and one discussion period per week. 

MS 431 SPECIAL TOPICS IN MATHEMATICS I 3 credits 

Prerequisite: Departmental approval. 
Students may pursue topics of special interest. 

MS 432 SPECIAL TOPICS IN MATHEMATICS II 3 credits 

Prerequisite: Departmental approval. 

Students may continue the topics begun in MS 431 or pursue different 

topics, according to their interests. 

MS 499 SENIOR SEMINAR IN MATHEMATICS 

Prerequisite: Senior standing. 1 credits 

PHYSICS 

No concentration is presently offered in Physics. However, sufficient 
courses are available to satisfy the related course requirements of other 
programs, and to form the basis for a program in Science for teaching in 
the secondary school. 

PS 121 FUNDAMENTAL PRINCIPLES OF PHYSICS 3 credits 

This course is presented in order that non-science concentrators may 
obtain an insight into the main principles and concepts of physics and 
their impact on our culture and daily life. The course is oriented toward 
students -who have had little background in mathematics and science. 
Modern physics is considered together with the treatment of classical 
physics. Topics included are the conservation principles, laws of mo- 
tion, gravitation, wave motion, the nature of light, electricity, quantum 
theory, special relativity, nuclear theory, heat, entropy, scientific mea- 
surement, and the primaries: length, mass, time temperature, and 
charge. Four hours per week. 

PS 123 GENERAL PHYSICS I 4 credits 

Prerequisite: MS 123 or MS 107-108. 

A study is made in depth of the fundamental concepts and laws of 
physics and their applications. Topics considered are mechanics, heat, 
and wave motion. Three lectures, one hour of discussion, and one three 
-hour laboratory per week. 

PS 124 GENERAL PHYSICS II 4 credits 

Prerequisite: PS 123. 

This is a continuation of PS 123 and includes: electricity, magnetism, 
optics, and modern physics, and modern physics. Three lectures, one 
hour of discussion, and one three-hour laboratory per week. 



67 



PS 221 GENERAL PHYSICS WITH CALCULUS I 4 credits 

Prerequisite: MS 124 Co-requisite: MS 221 

A rigorous study of the fundamental concepts and laws of physics is 
undertaken, making full use of the calculus. Topics included are mech- 
anics, heat, and wave motion. Three lectures, one hour of discussion, 
and one three-hour laboratory per week. 

PS 222 GENERAL PHYSICS WITH CALCULUS II 4 credits 

Prerequisite: PS 221. 

This is a continuation of PS 221, including electricity, magnetism, op- 
tics and modern physics. Three lecture, one hour of discussion, and one 
three-hour laboratory per week. 

PS 321 INTRODUCTION TO ATOMIC AND NUCLEAR 

PHYSICS 4 credits 

Prerequisite: PS 124. 

This course is designed to introduce the student to the concepts and 
methods underlying the fields of quantum physics and relativity. Three 
lectures and one three-hour laboratory per week. 

THE DIVISION OF PHILOSOPHY AND THEOLOGY 

Philosophy serves an important role in the total context of the educational 
program at Saint Leo College. It is through the problems studied in the pro- 
gram of philosophy that some fundamental questions concerning values inher- 
ent in human existence become more apparent. Coupled with the perspectives 
examined in the theology program, the student explores the vital issues of 
human endeavor. 

A concentration in Philosophy is offered by the Division 

PHILOSOPHY 

A concentration in Philosophy is designed as preparation for graduate study 
in philosophy and for teaching on the college level. It also may serve as a 
preparation for such professions as the ministry, law, and politics. 

Required courses for a concentration in Philosophy: 121, 222, 223, 431, 432, 
433, 434, 499 and two other upper division courses to meet the minimum 
requirement of 30 hours. 

200 and 300 level courses are designed for meeting the basic studies require- 
ment for all students. 400 level courses and primarily for philosophy concen- 
trators but are open to any qualified student with the permission of the in- 
structor. 

PY 121 INTRODUCTION TO PHILOSOPHY 3 credits 

An introduction to some of the major issues involved in man's philoso- 
phical quest for wisdom; to provide an insight into the various perspect 
ives from which these problems have been approached historically. 
Three hours per week. 

PY 222 PHILOSOPHY OF MAN 3 credits 

Prerequisite: PY 121 . 

A study of the nature of life with particular emphasis on the origin, 

nature and destiny of man. Three hours per week. 



68 



PY 223 LOGIC 3 credits 

Prerequisite: PY 121. 

A systematic inquiry into both Aristotelian and modern contributions 
to the science of logic, emphasizing the compatibility of traditional and 
symbolic logic. Three hours per week. 

PY 224 ETHICS 3 credits 

Prerequisite: PY 121. 

Concerns man's quest for happiness and the attainment of his ultimate 
end. Explores a range of value systems from that of Aristotelian- 
Thomism to existentialism and phenomenology. Three hours per week. 

PY 225 SOCIAL PHILOSOPHY 3 credits 

Prerequisite: PY 121. 

A study of the social nature and social responsibilities of modern man 

and the persevering social problems of our times. Three hours per week. 

PY 228 BUSINESS ETHICS 3 credits 

Prerequisite: PY 121. 

A study of general principles, and an investigation of what the honor- 
able businessman will do or refrain from doing from moral considera- 
tions. Research paper required on ethical practices in the conduct of 
business. Three hours per week. 

PY 327 PHILOSOPHY OF RELIGION 3 credits 

Prerequisite: PY 121. 

Traditional and contemporary theories of man's knowledge of God; Di- 
vine Providence and the problem of evil. An analysis of contemporary 
literature on these subjects. Three hours per week. 

PY 329 INDEPENDENT STUDY AND RESEARCH 3 credits 

Prerequisite: Permission of Philosophy Coordinator. 

PY 331 AMERICAN PHILOSOPHY 3 credits 

Prerequisite: PY 121. 

The study and evaluation of the development of pragmatism in the fig- 
ures of Peirce, James, and Dewey. Three hours per week. 

PY 332 PHILOSOPHY OF MARX 3 credits 

Prerequisite: PY 121. 

A positive but critical study of Marx's concept of man and his quest for 

authentic existence through work. Three hours per week. 

PY 333 EXISTENTIALISM 3 credits 

Prerequisite: PY 121. 

An analysis of the origins and basic theories of existentialism, including 
selections from the writings of Kierkegaard, Nietzsche, Heidegger, and 
Sartre. Three hours per week. 

PY 334 PHILOSOPHY OF SCIENCE 3 credits 

Prerequisite: PY 121. 

A philosophical consideration of the domain of nature with particular 
emphasis on the data and problems presented by the sciences and 
mathematics. Three hours per week. 



69 



PY 335 AESTHETICS 3 credits 

Prerequisite; PY 121. 

A philosophical consideration of the main problems in the Theory of 
Beauty; the study of the nature of beauty and its appreciation; the de- 
velopment, division, and dignity of the arts; consideration of the rela- 
tion between art and morality. Three hours per week. 

PY 336 PHILOSOPHY OF ATHEISM 3 credits 

Prerequisite: PY 121. 

A study of the scientific and humanistic forms of atheism, as proposed 
by Comte, Feuerbach, Marx, Nietzsche, Freud, and Sartre. Special at- 
tention will be given to the atheistic features present in numerous forms 
of belief in God. Three hours per week. 

PY 337 PHILOSOPHICAL PSYCHOLOGY 3 credits 

Prerequisite: PY 121. 

A historical survey of various philosophies of man, with emphasis on 

the metaphysical concept of person. Three hours per week. 

PY 422 CONTEMPORARY PHILOSOPHICAL PROBLEMS 3 credits. 

Prerequisite: PY 121. 

Presentation, discussion, and criticism of relevant living philosophical 

issues of the twentieth century. Three hours per week. 

PY 423 PROBLEMS OF KNOWLEDGE 3 credits 

Prerequisite: PY 121. 

A study of the theories of knowledge. An examination of the truth- 
value of knowledge, including an analysis of the existential judgement. 
Three hours per week. 

PY 429 ADVANCED INDEPENDENT STUDY 

AND RESEARCH 3 credits 

Prerequisite: Permission of Philosophy Coordinator. 
Independent readings from ancient, medieval, and modern authors to 
acquaint the student with fundamental problems as expressed in philo- 
sophical literature. 

PY431 ANCIENT PHILOSOPHY 3 credits 

Concentration course. 

A study of early Greek philosophy considering the transition from reli- 
gion to philosophy. The major themes and representatives in pre- 
Socratic thought, and a detailed examination of Plato and Aristotle, 
concluding with a study of Stoic and Epicurean thought. Three hours 
per week. 

PY 432 MEDIEVAL PHILOSOPHY 3 credits 

Concentration course. 

An examination of the influence of Jewish, Christian and Islamic reli- 
gions on philosophy, including a study of Plotinus, Augustine, Aquinas 
and the scholastic movement. Three hours per week. 

PY 433 MODERN PHILOSOPHY 3 credits 

Concentration course. 

A study of the origins, major movements and representatives of modern 
thought considering primarily Descartes, rationalism, British empiricism 
Kant and Hegel. 



70 



PY 434 METAPHYSICS 3 credits 

Prerequisite: PY 121. 

Exploration into the nature of reality as revealed through experience 
and interpreted by speculation. Problematic treatment of traditional 
and modern topics; various conceptions of this science; the relation of 
metaphysics to other disciplines. Three hours per week. 

PY 499 SENIOR SEMINAR IN PHILOSOPHY 3 credits 

Prerequisite: Senior standing. 

Required one semester of the senior year. 

THEOLOGY 

The courses in Theology explore the realm of human values as man attempts 
to relate to his church, his fellow Christians, and the non-Christian world. 

TY 221 STUDIES IN NON-CHRISTIAN RELIGIONS 3 credits 

An examination of the religious contributions of three major cultures; 
Chinese, Hindu, and Islamic. Evaluating the common elements in each. 
Three hours per week. 

TY 231 STUDIES IN THEORY AND PRACTICE 

OF CATHOLICISM 3 credits 

The historical and theological background of the development, mean- 
ing, and purpose of the Catholic Church's beliefs and practices with cur- 
rent theological explanations of Catholicism. Three hours per week. 

TY 321 CHRISTIAN THEMES IN MODERN LITERATURE 3 credits 

A study of the theological problems man faces as reflected in the mod- 
ern novel. Three hours per week. 

TY 323 THEOLOGY OF CHRISTIAN MARRIAGE 3 credits 

A study of the interpersonal relationships in marriage with emphasis up- 
on those principles used in determining an individual philosophy of 
marriage. Three hours per week. 

TY 324 STUDIES IN THE HISTORY OF 

CHRISTIAN THOUGHT 3 credits 

A survey of classical Christian writings from the Patristic, Reformation, 
and Post-Reformation periods, dealing with such authors as Augustine, 
Luther, Calvin, Rhaner, and Tillich. Three hours per week. 

THE DIVISION OF SOCIAL SCIENCE 

The Division of Social Science provides the opportunity to assess the multipli- 
city of social problems, issues, and decisions from different points of view. 
Courses are offered to assist the student to discover meaning for himself as 
a person functioning with others in groups, in the larger society, and in the 
modern world. 

Concentrations in History, Political Science, Psychology, and Sociology are 
offered by the Division. 

Students who plan to teach in the secondary schools in the social sciences 
should complete as electives the professional courses in Education prescribed 
by the Institute for Creative Teaching in addition to all the courses required 
in their concentration. 



71 



HISTORY 

A concentration in History is designed as preparation for graduate study in 
history or for teaching in the secondary schools. 

Required courses for a concentration in History: Hy 121, 122, 123, 124, 329, 
427, 499 and five other upper division courses in History to meet the mini- 
mum 36 hour requirement for the concentration. 

HY 121 UNITED STATES HISTORY TO 1865 3 credits 

A survey of the principal movements, events, ideas, and personalities in 
U.S. history from Colonial times to the Civil War. Three hours per 
week. 

HY 122 UNITED STATES HISTORY SINCE 1865 3 credits 

A survey of the principal movements, events, ideas, and personalities in 
U.S. history from the Civil War to the present. Three hours per week. 

HY 123 WESTERN CIVILIZATION TO 1500 3 credits 

A survey of the principal movements, events, ideas, and personalities in 
the Western World from ancient times to 1500. Three hours per week. 

HY 124 WESTERN CIVILIZATION SINCE 1500 3 credits 

A survey of the principal movements, events, ideas, and personalities in 
the Western World from 1500 to the present. Three hours per week. 

HY 225 EASTERN CIVILIZATION SINCE 1850 3 credits 

An intensive study of the historical development of the civilizations of 
both the Near East and the Far East, with emphasis on the impact of 
Western ideas and practices on the complex problems of American for- 
eign policy in the area. Three hours per week. 

HY 227 LATIN AMERICA IN THE TWENTIETH CENTURY 3 credits 

Prerequisite: HY 122. 

A survey of the major currents, events, ideas, and problems of Latin 
America from the revolutionary movements of the nineteenth century 
to the present. Three hours per week. 

HY 323 AFRICA SOUTH OF THE SAHARA 3 credits 

Prerequisite: Permission of the History Coordinator. 
A broad exploratory study of black African civilization from prehis- 
toric times through the present independence era, with emphasis on the 
pre-Colonial and post -Colonial periods. Three hours per week. 

HY 325 RUSSIA IN THE TWENTIETH CENTURY 3 credits 

Prerequisites: HY 123, 124. 

An intensive study of the history and development of Russia since 

1900. Three hours per week. 

HY 329 READINGS IN HISTORY 3 credits 

Prerequisite: Permission of History Coordinator. 

A study of selected readings in European and American history. Three 

hours per week. 

HY 421 EUROPE IN THE NINETEENTH CENTURY 3 credits 

Prerequisite: HY 124. 

An intensive study of the principal movements, events, and ideas in the 

Europe of the nineteenth century. Three hours per week. 



72 



HY 422 EUROPE IN THE TWENTIETH CENTURY 3 credits 

Prerequisite: HY 124. 

A study of the major currents, events, and ideas in European history 

from 1870 to the present. Three hours per week. 

HY 423 THE UNITED STATES IN THE 

TWENTIETH CENTURY 3 credits 

Prerequisites: HY 121, 122. 

A study of the major currents, events, and ideas in United States His- 
tory from the rise of big business and progressivism to the present. 
Three hours per week. 

HY 425 UNITED STATES DIPLOMATIC HISTORY 3 credits 

Prerequisites: HY 121, 122. 

A survey of the principal themes and events in American foreign rela- 
tions from the American Revolution to the present. Three hours per 
week. 

HY 427 HISTORY OF IDEAS 3 credits 

Prerequisite: Permission of History Coordinator. 

A study of the major intellectual currents which have dominated histor- 
ical thought, particularly in the Western World. Three hours per week. 

HY 429 ADVANCED INDEPENDENT STUDY 

AND RESEARCH 3 credits 

Prerequisite: Permission of History Coordinator. 

A study of historical areas of interest to students on an independent 

basis. 

HY 499 SENIOR SEMINAR I 3 credits 

Prerequisite: senior standing. 

Required of History concentrators one semester of the senior year. An 
in depth study with stress on research and discussion of major themes 
in history. Three hours per week. 

HY 499 SENIOR SEMINAR II 3 credits 

Analysis and discussion on the nature of history, philosophies of his- 
tory, current historical problems. Three hours per week. 



POLITICAL SCIENCE 



A concentration in Political Science is designed as preparation for graduate 
study in political science, for teaching in secondary schools, for the legal pro- 
fession, and for a career in politics or public service 

Required courses for a concentration in Political Science: PCL 121, 223, 224, 
311, 312, 323, 499, and five upper division courses in Political Science to 
meet the minimum requirement of 36 hours for a concentration. 

PCL 121 INTRODUCTION TO POLITICAL SCIENCE 3 credits 

An insight into what Political Science is; the political and the non-polit- 
ical. Political Science as a behavioral science, the strategies of research; 
the individual and the political system; and the quest for the political 
ideal. Three hours per week. 



73 



PCL 123 THE LAW AND SOCIETY 3 credits 

A study of the law and its application to or affect upon all aspects of 
our society. An insight into sources and kinds of law, court systems, 
crimes, property and personal rights, contracts, and laws affecting mar- 
riage and the family. Three hours per week. 

PCL 223 AMERICAN FEDERAL GOVERNMENT 3 credits 

A study of the origin, nature, and development of the Constitution, the 
organization, powers, and functioning of the executive, legislative, and 
judicial systems. Three hours per week. 

PCL 224 AMERICAN STATE AND LOCAL GOVERNMENT 3 credits 

Prerequisite: PCL 223. 

An analysis of those sovereign powers retained by the states under the 
constitution. The relationships between the federal, state, and local gov- 
ernments are examined in detail. Three hours per week. 

PCL 227 SCOPE AND METHOD OF POLITICAL ANALYSIS 3 credits 

Prerequisite: PCL 121. 

An analysis of empirical research methods, such as game theory, use of 
computers, polling, and research design as they apply to political sci- 
ence. Three hours per week. 

PCL 311 POLITICAL THEORY I 3credits 

Prerequisite: PCL 223. 

A meaningful enquiry into the role of the state, its auxiliary agencies 
and functions as exemplified by the writings of political philosophers 
from Plato to Hobbes. Three hours per week. 

PCL 312 POLITICAL THEORY II 3 credits 

Prerequisite: PCL 223. 

An analysis of political philosophers from Locke to modern times. 

Three hours per week. 

PCL 323 COMPARATIVE GOVERNMENT 3 credits 

Prerequisites: PCL 311, 312. 

A study of the political systems and government of the United King- 
dom and the Commonwealth system, France, Italy, the U.S.S.R.; Ger- 
many, China, and others, noting the similarities with and differences 
from the institutions of the United States. Three hours per week. 

PCL 324 INTER-AMERICAN RELATIONS 3 credits 

Prerequisite: PCL 323. 

Political relations between the United States and Canada, and between 
the United States and the Latin American nations, commencing with 
the Monroe Doctrine and including the functioning of the Organization 
of American States and the Alliance of Progress. Three hours per week. 

PCL 325 PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION 3 credits 

Prerequisite: PCL 224. 

An analysis of the nature of public administration, its structures and 
limitations; its staff organization and chain of command; its unemploy- 
ment policies and personnel training and management; its employees' 
organizations and its public relations. Three hours per week. 



74 



PCL 326 UNITED STATES CONSTITUTIONAL LAW 3 credits 

Prerequisite: PCL 224. 

An intensive study and analysis of the U.S. Constitution with analysis 
of the more important Supreme Court decisions. Particular attention 
will be paid to 'civil liberties development. Three hours per week. 

PCL 329 INDEPENDENT STUDY AND RESEARCH 3 credits 

Prerequisite: Permission of the Political Science Coordinator. 
Advanced reading and special study in areas of interest to the individual 
student. 

PCL 412 POLITICAL IDEOLOGIES 3 credits 

Prerequisite: PCL 311, 312. 

A description and analysis of the practical application of trends of po- 
litical thought. The course will examine such basic ideas as Democracy 
in all its shades, and authoritarian and totalitarian political thought, in- 
cluding Communism, National Socialism, and Fascism. Three hours per 
week. 

PCL 421 POLITICAL GEOGRAPHY 3 credits 

Prerequisite: PCL 323. 

An analysis of the geographical factors upon the political development 

of the world. Special emphasis upon the use of maps. Three hours per 

week. 

PCL 422 AMERICAN POLITICAL PARTIES 3 credits 

Prerequisite: PCL 224. 

A study of the origins, nature and functions of parties within the Amer- 
ican system of government. Three hours per week. 

PCL 423 INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS I 3 credits 

Prerequisite: PCL 323. 

An insight into the development of modern systems of relations among 
nations with special emphasis upon American diplomacy and involve- 
ment in world affairs. Three hours per week. 

PCL 424 INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS II 3 credits 

Prerequisite: PCL 423. 

A study of the evolution of international organizations such as the Uni- 
versal Postal Union, International Court of Justice , League of Nations 
and the United Nations. Attention will be paid to regional organizations 
such as N.A.T.O., S.E.A.T.O., and the Warsaw Pact. Three hours per 
week. 

PCL 429 ADVANCED INDEPENDENT STUDY 3 credits 

AND RESEARCH 

Prerequisite: permission of the Political Science Coordinator. 
Advanced reading, study and research in areas designed to fit the special 
needs and interest of the individual student. 

PCL 499 SENIOR SEMINAR 3 credits 

Prerequisite: senior standing. 

Advanced work in the integration of concepts within the field of politi- 
cal science and the relationship of these to other areas of study in So- 
cial Science. 



75 



PSYCHOLOGY 



A concentration in Psychology is designed as preparation for graduate work 
in psychology or guidance, for school guidance and < counseling personnel 
work, or social welfare positions. 

Required courses for a concentration in Psychology: PSY 121, 222, 223, 224, 
499 and seven other upper division courses in Psychology to meet the mini- 
mum 36 hour requirement for the concentration. Biology, sociology and the 
humanities are suggested as electives. 



PSY 121 INTRODUCTION TO PSYCHOLOGY 3 credits 

A survey of major topics in psychology. Three hours per week. 

PSY 222 PSYCHOLOGY OF ADJUSTMENT 3 credits 

Psychological factors involved in the processes of human adjustment. 
Three hours per week. 

PSY 223 BEHAVIORAL STATISTICS 3 credits 

Prerequisite: MS 123 or MS 107-108. 

Descriptive statistics, elementary probability theory and statistical in- 
ference with emphasis on statistics as a research tool. Three hours per 
week. 

PSY 224 EXPERIMENTAL PSYCHOLOGY 3 credits 

Prerequisites: PSY 121, 223. 

The application of major scientific research methods and strategies to 

psychology. Three hours per week. 

PSY 321 PSYCHOLOGICAL TESTS AND MEASUREMENTS 3 credits 

Prerequisites: PSY 121, 223. 

A review of standard tests and questionaires used to evaluate ability, 
achievement, and personality. Individual projects in constructing, ad- 
ministering, scoring, and interpreting individual and group tests. Three 
hours per week. 

PSY 322 PHYSIOLOGICAL PSYCHOLOGY 3 credits 

Prerequisite: PSY 121. 

The structure and function of the central nervous system as related to 
emotion, motivation, learning, and theory of brain functions. Three 
hours per week. 

PSY 326 DEVELOPMENTAL PSYCHOLOGY 3 credits 

Prerequisite: PSY 121. 

Facts and theories concerning psychological development and change 
throughout the life span are considered. Attention is given to normal 
problems of adjustment at crucial phases of development. Three hours 
per week. 

PSY 327 ABNORMAL PSYCHOLOGY 3 credits 

Prerequisites: PSY 121 or 222. 

The influence of motivational, experimental, and perceptual factors in 

the process of learning and cognition. Three hours per week. 



76 



PSY 422 LEARNING AND MOTIVATION 3 credits 

Prerequisite: PSY 224. 

A study of the basic learning and motivational processes with emphasis 
on the nature of the problem, experimental procedures and theoretical 
significance. Three hours per week. 

PSY 423 EDUCATIONAL PSYCHOLOGY 3 credits 

Prerequisite: PSY 121. 

Understanding of the applications of psychological principles to the ed- 
ucational process. Three hours per week. 

PSY 424 INDIVDUAL INTELLIGENCE TESTING 3 credits 

Prerequisite: permission of Psychology Coordinator. 
A study of intelligence testing. Experience in the administration and 
interpretation of the Wechsler tests and the Stanford Binets. Three 
hours per week. (Materials approximately $75.00) 

PSY 425 PRACTICUM IN PSYCHOLOGY 12 credits 

Prerequisite: permission of Psychology Coordinator. 
480 hours of supervised observation and training in community and in- 
dustrial settings. 

PSY 427 PERSONALITY THEORY 3 credits 

Prerequisite: PSY 121 or 222. 

A review of the development of personality theories influencing mod- 
ern psychological thought. Three hours per week. 

PSY 428 COUNSELING PRINCIPLES AND PRACTICES 3 credits 

Prerequisite: permission of Psychology Coordinator. 

An examination of theory and practice in counseling. Professional and 

ethical issues are considered. Three hours per week. 

PSY 429 ADVANCED INDEPENDENT STUDY 

AND RESEARCH 3 credits 

Prerequisite: permission of Psychology Coordinator. 
Advanced reading, testing or projects involving research and experimen- 
tation. 

PSY 499 SENIOR SEMINAR IN PSYCHOLOGY 3 credits 

Prerequisite: senior^ standing. 

Required one semester of the senior year. The integration of concepts 
within the field of psychology and the relation of these to other areas 
of study. Three hours per week. 

SOCIOLOGY 



Two programs of concentration in Sociology are offered. The first program 
will be for those students who plan to prepare for graduate study in Socio- 
logy. The required courses are SY 121, 223, 224, 323, 324, 327, 499 and five 
other upper division courses in Sociology. 

The second concentration is provided for those students who anticipate place- 
ment in a social agency. Required courses are SY 121, 222, 223, 324, 420, 
422, 423, 499 and four other upper division courses in Sociology. (SY 428 
may be substituted for SY 420; SY 425 for SY 499). 



77 



SY 121 INTRODUCTION TO SOCIOLOGY 3 credits 

A survey of the major topics in sociology. Three hours per week. 

SY 222 SOCIAL PROBLEMS 3 credits 

The major social problems affecting individuals and groups in modern 
industrial societies. Three hours per week. 

SY 223 BEHAVIORAL STATISTICS 3 credits 

Prerequisite: MS 123 or MS 107-1 08. 

Descriptive statistics, elementary probability theory and statistical 
inference with emphasis on statistics as a research tool. Three hours per 
week. 
SY 224 SOCIAL INVESTIGATION 3 credits 

Prerequisites: SY 121, 223. 

Methods and techniques of social research, design of sociological stu- 
dies, collection of data, and interpretation of results. Three hours per 
week. 

SY 321 SOCIAL STRUCTURE AND SOCIAL ORGANIZATION credits 

Prerequisite: SY 121. 

An analysis of existing social structures and social organizations, with 
an in-depth study of organizational activity and social structural inte- 
gration. Three hours per week. 

SY 322 MINORITY GROUP RELATIONS 3 credits 

Prerequisite: SY 121. 

Current themes of ethnic group and majority-minority group relations, 
cross-cultural case studies, group identification, and social changes. 
Three hours per week. 

SY 323 SOCIOLOGICAL THEORY 3 credits 

Prerequisite: SY 121, 224. 

Social theory through Comte and Spencer followed by investigation of 
such theorists as Durkheim, Simmel, Weber, Parsons, and Merton. Three 
hours per week. 

SY 324 MARRIAGE AND THE FAMILY 3 credits 

Prerequisite: SY 121. s, 

A pragmatic study of marriage and the family with the major focus on 

the preparation for marriage. Three hours per week. 

SY 325 URBAN SOCIOLOGY 3 credits 

Prerequisite: SY 121. 

The social structure of the community in modern industrial societies. 

Three hours per week. 

SY 326 CRIMINOLOGY 3 credits 

Prerequisite: SY 121. 

Criminal behavior, law and law enforcement, crime in the United 

States, penology, and crime prevention. Three hours per week. 

SY 327 CULTURAL ANTHROPOLOGY 3 credits 

Prerequisite: SY 121. 

A study of the formation, structure, and function of cultural organiza- 
tion and dynamics. Three hours per week. 



78 



SY 329 INDEPENDENT STUDY AND RESEARCH 3 credits 

Prerequisite: permission of Sociology Coordinator. 

Advanced reading and research in fields designed to fit special interests. 

SY 420 SOCIAL GROUP DYNAMICS 3 credits 

Prerequisite: senior standing in Psychology or Sociology. 
A study of group work as related to personality adjustment. The theory 
and practice of group work will be studied and demonstrated. Three 
hours per week. 

SY 421 JUVENILE DELINQUENCY 3 credits 

Prerequisite: SY 121. 

The problem, its theories, and methods of control and treatment. Three 

hours per week. 

SY 422 INTRODUCTION TO SOCIAL WORK 3 credits 

Prerequisites: SY 121, 222. 

The development of organized social services and institutions to meet 

human needs. Three hours per week. 

SY 423 SOCIAL CASEWORK 3 credits 

Prerequisite: permission of Sociology Coordinator. 

The theory and method of social casework. Supervised field observa- 
tions. Three hours per week. 

SY 424 FAMILY ANALYSIS 3 credits 

Prerequisite: permission of Sociology Coordinator. 

Theory of inter-personal relations and interaction in the modern family. 

Analysis of roles and function. Three hours per week. 

SY 425 PRACTICUM IN SOCIAL WORK 9 credits 

Prerequisite: permission of Sociology Coordinator. 
Supervised observation and training in community agencies. 

SY 426 SOCIAL CASEWORK LABORATORY 3 credits 

Prerequisite: SY 423 or PSY 428 and permission of the instructor. 
A practice casework workshop to include experience in individual 
group casework, intake procedures, multiple counseling, staffing , be- 
havior-modification, and record keeping. 

SY 428 COUNSELING PRINCIPLES AND PRACTICES 3 credits 

Prerequisite: permission of Psychology Coordinator. 

An examination of theory and practice in counseling. Professional and 

ethical issues are considered. Same as PSY 428. Three hours per week. 

SY 429 ADVANCED INDEPENDENT STUDY 

AND RESEARCH 3 credits 

Prerequisite: permission of Sociology Coordinator. 

Advanced reading and research in fields designed to fit special interests. 

SY 499 SENIOR SEMINAR 3 credits 

Prerequisite: senior standing. 

The integration of concepts within the field of sociology and the rela- 
tion of these with the other areas of study. Three hours rier week. 



79 



THE INSTITUTE FOR CREATIVE TEACHING 



The Institute for Creative Teaching offers an innovative, individualized, per- 
formance-based, Teacher Education Program which is approved by the Flor- 
ida State Board of Education. 

The Institute's curriculum is firmly anchored in the Basic Studies Program of 
the College. The values of the liberalizing arts and sciences not only lead stu- 
dents to greater confidence in themselves as persons, but also extend their 
communication with other men and women in all professions. 

The Institute for Creative Teaching embraces four functions: 

1. It directs the continuing development, implementation and evalu- 
ation of the Teacher Education Program of the College. 

2. It cooperates in creating mutually beneficial situations in which 
pre-internship, classroom experiences for education students pro- 
vide additional staffing for Pasco County schools. 

3. It offers its services for advancing education throughout the Col- 
lege and the larger community. 

4. It initiates, channels and tests ideas, projects and experiments 
directed toward improving learning and teaching on local, state, 
national levels. 

Students may work toward teaching certification either within the State 
approval program or aside for the approved program. 

Students preparing to teach in elementary education, music (K - 12), physi- 
cal education (K - 12), history and political science at the secondary level 
may apply for admission to the approved teacher education program. A stu- 
dent who is graduated from the approved program is recommended by the 
Institute for certification by the Florida State Department of Education. 

Also, since Saint Leo College ia accredited by the Southern Association of 
Colleges and Schools, a graduate who plans appropriately may obtain certifi- 
cation for teaching by submitting his transcript for evaluation by the certifi- 
cation department of the state in which he plans to teach. 

Prospective guidance counselors are advised to prepare for regular teacher cer- 
tification since a minimum of two years of teaching experience is ordinarily 
required for school counseling. 

Admisstion to EN 410, the Internship, is by permission of the Director of the 
Institute for Creative Teaching. In some instances, a concentration in educa- 
tion may be offered without the Internship. 



ELEMENTARY EDUCATION 



Required for a concentration in Elementary Education is the performance of 
objectives listed for EN 121, 221, 321, 323, 325, 326, 327, (MS 121), 328, 
333 (PHE 223), 410, 421, or 425, 423, 428, and 499; MC 123. Recommend- 
ed also are SPH 221 and/or 222, and HY 121 and/or 122. 

Selection of electives should be made only after examination of requirements 
for certification in the state or states in which the student plans to teach. 



80 



SECONDARY EDUCATION 



Students who will teach in junior and senior high school must take the 
courses required for a concentration in their chosen subject fields. Also re- 
quired are performances of objectives listed for En 121, 221, 321, 323, 410, 
and 428. Students should include courses which fulfill the requirements of 
the state or states in which they plan to teach. 



Students preparing for teaching need to maintain within their program a mini- 
mum of 6 hours in each of the following 6 areas: 

1 . English composition, rhetoric, or grammar. 

2. Speech, journalism or elementary foreign languages. 

3. Health, physical education, psychology, religion, philosophy, 
logic, ethics, nutrition, problems of living in home and family or 
community living. 

4. Biological Science and/or physical sciences plus Mathematics. 

5. Social Studies (credit in two areas): geography, history, political 
science, sociology, anthropology or economics. 

6. Humanities and applied arts (credit in at least two areas): litera- 
ture, (English, American, world), literature written in a foreign 
language, music, technological skills, construction design and fine 
arts as applied to personal and family living. 

Additionally, teacher candidates will include in their programs the courses 
required by the Institute for Creative Teaching as stipulated in the current 
catalogue. 



K-12 EDUCATION 



Saint Leo College offers preparation toward teaching certification in grades 
K-12 for Art, Music, and Physical Education concentrators. Students planning 
to teach in these three subjects must take the courses required for the concen- 
tration in addition to performing the objectives stated for EN 121, 221, 321, 
323,410, 428, and 499. 

EDUCATION 



EN 121 SYSTEMS APPROACH TO SOLVING 

EDUCATIONAL PROBLEMS 3 credits 

Laboratory course in developing systems for solving educational pro- 
blems. Three hours per week. 

EN 221 HUMAN GROWTH AND DEVELOPMENT 3 credits 

A longitudinal study of the person, considering the emotional, physical, 
social, and intellectual factors of growth from a psychological ap- 
proach. Initiation of observations and pre-internship teaching experi- 
ence. Three hours per week. 



81 



EN 321 THE SCHOOL PROGRAM 3 credits 

Prerequisite: EN 221. 

An overview of the elementary through the secondary school program: 
organization, administration, and evaluation of curricula as reflections 
of educational philosophies and goals with emphasis on scope of con- 
tent in the sequential process of learning from the earliest formal in- 
struction through secondary levels. Survey of current trends and inno- 
vations. In-depth research of content, objectives, and evaluation by in- 
dividuals in areas and levels of special interest. Observation of programs 
in the vicinity of the College. Three hours per week. 

EN 323 METHOD: THE THEORY AND PRACTICE 3 credits 

Prerequisite: EN 321. 

A critical study of method and the variability of its application. Exami- 
nation of the role of education in a democracy ^discovery of unifying 
concepts among the ideas: theories of learning, needs and interests of 
individuals, developmental tasks of growing persons, unity of know- 
ledge, nature of student-teacher and student-student inter-actions. Pre- 
internship experiences in micro-teaching, teaching-aid and tutorial ser- 
vices both on and off campus. A laboratory course demonstrating the 
provision of an environment in which both student and teacher gain 
insight into self and others and into interactions between self and 
others. Three hours per week. To be taken in semester immediately pre-, 
ceding internship. (Offered first semester only.) 

EN 325 MUSIC IN THE ELEMENTARY 

SCHOOL (See MC 325) 3 credits 

Prerequisites: EN 221 and MC 123 (or demonstrated proficiency). 
Study of objectives, theories, and techniques of production of music in 
the primary and intermediate grades, with special attention to repertory 
and supervision of creative activities. Directed observation in the ele- 
mentary school is required. (Offered first semester only.) Three hours 
per week. 

EN 326 ART IN THE ELEMENTARY SCHOOL 3 credits 

Prerequisite: EN 221. 

Theory and practice of art activities in the elementary school. Under- 
standing of the creative experience in visual arts through workshop ac- 
tivity, familiarity with art education theory, and acquaintance with de- 
signing and presenting meaningful art experiences. (Offered second se- 
mester only.) Three hours per week. 

EN 327 MATHEMATICS IN THE ELEMENTARY 

SCHOOL (See MS 121) 1-4 credits 

Prerequisite: Permission of Director of the Institute for Creative Teach- 
ing. 

A special adaptation of selected topics of Basic Studies mathematics for 
students who plan to teach in the elementary school. This course fulfills 
the Basic Studies requirement as well as requirements for certification 
of teachers in the elementary field. Topics considered in this course in- 
clude: beginning number concepts, structure of number sustem, devel- 
opment of decimal numeration system, modular arithmetic, other base 
numeration systems, addition and its properties, subtraction, division, 
addition and subtraction algorithms, multiplication algorithms and the 
distributive property, division algorithms, the whole-number system, 
prime numbers and divisibility tests, rational numbers, and probability. 
(EN 327 may be substituted for MS 121). 



82 



EN 328 NATURAL SCIENCE IN THE ELEMENTARY 

SCHOOL 3 credits 

Prerequisite: EN 321. or approval of advisor. 

Consideration of fundamental concepts in natural science. Development 
of ideas and attitudes intrinsic to the nature of science; development of 
guides for doing research at each grade level. Practice in respecting all 
ideas by all students and in developing techniques for finding new con- 
figurations of knowledge. Exercise in living with relentless change. (Of- 
fered second semester only). Three hours per week. 

EN 329 INDEPENDENT STUDY AND RESEARCH 1-4 credits 

Prerequisite: Approval of Director of the Institute for Creative Teach- 
ing. 

Designed to allow the student to pursue in-depth a problem or research 
topic related to his particular professional goal or interest. 

EN 333 PHYSICAL EDUCATION IN THE ELEMENTARY SCHOOL 

(See PHE 223) 3 credits 

Designed for elementary education concentrators and those physical 
education concentrators who will teach in the elementary schools . Em- 
phasis on skills needed by the teacher and reference materials and 
equipment used. Observation and participation in elementary schools. 
(Offered first semester only.) Three hours per week. 

EN 410 THE INTERNSHIP 10 credits 

Prerequisite: EN 323. 

Offered near completion of concentration with approval of Director of 

Teacher Education. 300 hour observation and participation experience 

in local public schools. Requires time block of 8:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. 

for one semester. EN 428 included in the same time block. ($25.00 fee. 

Student provides his own transportation.) (Offered second semester 

only.) 

EN 421 LANGUAGE AND LITERATURE IN THE 

ELEMENTARY SCHOOL 3 credits 

Prerequisite: EN 321 or approval of Institute Director. 
Study of the language arts as creative effort toward self-expression and 
communication. Traditional and modern approaches studies. (Offered 
first semester only.) Three hours per week. 




83 



EN 422 EDUCATIONAL MEDIA 3 credits 

Consideration of concepts related to learning via multiple educational 
media. Development of skills in preparation and/or operation of media. 
Three hours per week. (Offered first semester only.) 

EN 423 TEACHING READING 3 credits 

Prerequisites: EN 321 and 323. 

Study of basic theories underlying traditional and newer approaches to 
teaching reading. Survey of techniques, equipment, materials and organ- 
ization of reading programs. Consideration of diagnostic and develop- 
mental procedures useful to teachers. Laboratory experience in the 
Reading Program. Three hours per week. (Offeree* first semester only.) 

EN 425 SOCIAL AND BEHAVORIAL STUDIES IN THE 

ELEMENTARY SCHOOL 3 credits 

Prerequisite: EN 321 or approval of Institute Director. 
Study of creating a social climate conducive to the growth of each child 
and teacher and to the development of orderly and productive work 
patterns. Study of cooperation among groups within a school and with- 
in the larger community; exploration of the guidance functions of the 
classroom teacher; examination of outstanding programs in the social 
studies — their content, resources, and organization, formulation of 
principles for development, implementation, and evaluation. (Offered 
second semester only.) Three hours per week. 

EN 428 FOUNDATIONS OF EDUCATION 6 credits 

A survey of the development of historical, philosophical and sociolo- 
gical bases of education and agencies which direct and motivate the 
work of the schools. Required of all students enrolled in EN 410, The 
Internship. (Offered second semester only.) 

EN 429 ADVANCED INDEPENDENT STUDY 1-4 credits 

AND RESEARCH 

Prerequisite: Approval of the Director of the Institute for Creative 

Teaching. 

Designed to allow the student to pursue in-depth a problem or research 

topic related to his particular professional goal or interest. 

EN 499 SENIOR SEMINAR IN EDUCATION 3 credits 

Required of all seniors concentrating in Physical Education and /or Ele- 
mentary Education. 

A seminar treatment of topics relevant to needs and interests of stu- 
dents enrolled. Three hours per week. 

PHYSICAL EDUCATION 



Required courses for a concentration in Physical Education (K-12): PHE 101, 
102, 205, 206, 305, 306, 221, 321, 325 or 327 for men, 323 for women, 
329, 423, and two additional courses in Physical Education: BLY 220; and 
EN 221, 321, 323, and 499. 

People desiring to complete an approved teacher education program must 
take EN 410 and 428. 

PHE 101-102 1 credit each 

Functional course required of all students consisting of lectures and 
activity participation. Students who are unable to participate in normal 



84 



activity will have an adapted program. Two semesters - two hours per 
week. 

PHE 201-202 SWIMMING 1 credit each 

Prerequisite: PHE 102. 

Required of all students except those unable to take it for physical 
causes, or those that are capable of passing proficiency tests in one or 
both courses. 201 - Begining Swimming. 202 - Intermediate and Ad- 
vanced Swimming. 

PHE 203-204 1 credit each 

Prerequisite: PHE 102. 

Designed for students unable to take PHE 201-202 for physical causes. 

PHE 301-302 1 credit each 

Prereq u isite : PHE 2 02. 

Required of all students except those unable to take it for physical rea- 
sons. Each student selects and engages in individual sports and recre- 
ational activities from the following: golf, tennis, archery, bowling, 
handball, weightlifting, fencing, karate, horsemanship, senior life saving 
and waterfront instruction. 

PHE 303-304 1 credit each 

Prerequisite: PHE 204. 

Designed for students unable to take PHE 301-302 for physical causes. 

PHE 205-206; 305-306 CONCENTRATORS ACTIVITIES 2 credits each 

Prerequisite: PHE 101-102. 

A two-year sequence of activities emphasizing instruction in perform- 
ance, instructional and officiating skills and techniques for physical ed- 
ucation concentrators. Substitute for PHE 201-202 and 301-302. 

PHE 221 PRINCIPLES OF PHYSICAL EDUCATION 3 credits 

Contemporary theory and practice in physical education, emphasis on 
history, philosophy and objectives. 

PHE 223 PHYSICAL EDUCATION IN THE ELEMENTARY SCHOOL 
(See EN 333) 3credits 

Designed for elementary education concentrators and those physical 
education concentrators who will teach in the elementary schools. Em- 
phasis is on skills needed by the teacher and reference materials and 
equipment used. Observation and participation in elementary schools. 

PHE 321 PHYSICAL EDUCATION IN THE SECONDARY 

SCHOOL 3 credits 

Prerequisite: PHE 221. 

Understanding of the nature of the various activities needed in the total 
physical education program of a school and of the appropriateness of 
the activities to the level of development of boys and girls; mastery of 
the related materials, equipment, and skills needed by the teacher in 
each of the activities. Special attention is given to the intramural pro- 
gram. 

PHE 323 TEAM SPORTS AND GAMES FOR WOMEN 3 credits 

Prerequisite: PHE 221. 

The principles and practices of coaching and teaching women's sports, 



85 



including fundamentals and skills. 

PHE 325 COACHING FOOTBALL AND TRACK 3 credits 

Prerequisites: PHE 221, BLY 220. 

For men. The principles and practices of coaching football and track, 
emphasizing the development of a philosophy of coaching, and the gen- 
eral mental and physical training of an athlete. 

PHE 327 COACHING BASKETBALL AND BASEBALL 3 credits 

Prerequisites: PHE 221, BLY 220. 

For men. The principles and practices of coaching basketball and base- 
ball, emphasizing the development of a philosophy of coaching, and the 
general mental and physical training of an athlete. 

PHE 329 ADAPTIVE PHYSICAL EDUCATION 3 credits 

Prerequisites: PHE 221 and BL Y 220. 

Junior standing. Theory and practice in developing physical education 
programs for temporarily disabled and for those students who can sel- 
dom, or never, take an active part in regular physical education pro- 
grams. 

PHE 421 RECREATIONAL LEADERSHIP AND 

ADMINISTRATION 3 credits 

Prerequisite: PHE 221. 

The history, practices, policies, leadership, and supervision of school 
and community playgrounds, centers and campuses. Special emphasis 
on study of student leadership. 

PHE 423 ADMINISTRATION OF PHYSICAL EDUCATION 

AND ATHLETICS 3 credits 

Prerequisites: PHE 321, senior standing. 

Policies, standards, and procedures in the organization and administra- 
tion of the program of education, intramural activities, and varsity ath- 
letics. Emphasis on the education perspective and the many, adminis- 
trative problems. 

PHE 425 PREVENTION AND TREATMENT OF 

ATHLETIC INJURIES 3 credits 

Prerequisite: PHE 221. 

An in-depth study of and practical experience in the practices and tech- 
niques utilized in preventing and/or treating injuries in teaching physi- 
cal education, in athletic coaching, in recreational leadership, and in in- 
tramural supervision. 

THE DEPARTMENT OF CONTINUING EDUCATION 



The Department of Continuing Education has responsibility for the develop- 
ment of quality programs for the adult part-time students as well as for ex- 
tending the services oft the college faculty and facilities to the people of the 
community, the region, and the state. 

To accomplish this end, three general areas, Evening and Off-campus Pro- 



86 



grams, Community and Area Service Programs, and Summer School have 
been developed. 

The general objectives of the Department of Continuing Education are those 
of the institution. In addition, the following specific objectives serve to ex- 
tend the resources of the College to the adult community. 

1 . To provide a broad curricular program at the college level which 
will aid those who cannot normally pursue an educational pro- 
gram during the day in advancing goals ordinarily sought by full- 
time students. 

2. To provide courses and programs of value and interest to adults 
which meet specialized needs not ordinarily satisfied by the regu- 
lar college day program. 

3. To provide educational extension services for in-service teachers. 

4. To provide an extension of the day school which will increase the 
number of class sections to accommodate more students and 
allow greater flexibility in registration. 



5. To be cognizant of community and area needs for educational 
programs and to serve as the liaison between the community and 
the departments of the college for use of faculty and facilities. 

An effort is made to present any course for which there is a sufficient de- 
mand and available facilities. In most cases, a minimum of 15 -requests from 
individuals or a minimum guarantee by an organization for a specific course is 
considered sufficient for exploratory action on the part of the college. 

Many of the courses listed in the day section of the catalog will be taught in 
the Evening and Off-campus Programs in addition to those listed in the Con- 
tinuing Education section. 

EN 403S A FIELD STUDY IN COMMUNITY HEALTH 

RESOURCES 4 credits 

This course offers the student an opportunity to: 1. Become better ac- 
quainted with the personnel, activities and resources of his County 
Health Department and other official and voluntary health agencies. 2. 
Increase his knowledge and understandings by direct experience with 
the community health problems, needs and community resources in the 
county and state at large. 3. Gain new insights and understandings by 
direct experience with the community health problems, programs and 
resources which will enable him to improve his school health program. 
4. Meet certain certification requirements. 5. Act as a resource person 
in health matters for the school or the county. 



EN 441 BEHAVIORAL OBJECTIVES AND THEIR 

IMPLEMENTATION 3 credits 

The course is designed to teach how to write behavioral objectives in 
the cognitive, psychomotor, and affective domains and how to imple- 
ment them in classrooms. 



87 



ENGLISH 400 DRAMA: THEATRE FOR THE SECONDARY 

SCHOOL TEACHER 3 credits 

A course directed to the practices of the director and the technical di- 
rector in readying a play for the stage; applied practice in directing, 
lighting and scene design and construction. 

HUMANITIES 420 3 credits 

This institute will concern itself with the teaching of the Humanities in 
the Elementary schools. Materials and methods will be explained and 
course content carefully considered. 

MUSIC 420 SEMINAR: PRINCIPLES, PRESENT PRACTICES AND 

FRONTIERS IN MUSIC EDUCATION. 3 credits 

This course deals with the continuing examination of the instructional 
methods in music. The areas of stress will be the teaching of music at 
the elementary level. 

PSYCHOLOGY 427 BEHAVIORAL PROBLEMS OF 

NORMAL CHILDREN 3 credits 

This course provides the student with insight into and an understanding 
of the concepts, normality and adjustment of the child as he progresses 
through his environmental milieu. The content of the course will in- 
clude: Growth and Development, Psychologic Care, Etiologic Factors in 
Behavioral Problems, Emotional Problems, the Management of Behav- 
ioral Problems, Problems of Habit and Training, and Antisocial Behavior, 
and Antisocial Beharior. 

READING 420 PRACTICUM IN READING METHODOLOGY AND 
TECHNIQUES 

K-6 ELEMENTARY LEVEL 3 credits 



READING 421 PRACTICUM IN READING METHODOLOGY AND 
TECHNIQUES 

7-12 SECONDARY LEVEL 3 credits 

These courses will provide an opportunity for the student to investigate 
and study diagnosis and correction of reading difficulties. Each will be a 
practicum in the true sense of the word in that each student will have 
an opportunity to work with the latest devices, techniques and evalua- 
tive procedures used by the classroom teacher in working with his stu- 
dents. 

THEOLOGY 404 THE HISTORY OF THE 

CATHOLIC CHURCH 3 credits 

The emphasis in this course is to determine the major philosophical, 
political and social ideas that shaped the doctrine and dogma of the 
church. Emphasis will be given to the Early Church, Reformation and 
20th Century periods. 

THEOLOGY 424 THE THEOLOGY AND STRUCTURE 

OF THE EARLY CHURCH 3 credits 

The following topics will be treated from the point of view found in the 
New Testament and the writings of the Apostolic Fathers. It will be the 
purpose of the course to determine why and how these key ideas devel- 
oped and took shape in the earliest history of the Church. Canonicity 
of the New Testament/ Apostolicity, Papal Authority and Power, 
Christology, Ecclesiology, Moral Theology. 



88 




89 



BOARD OF TRUSTEES 



Officers 



Chairman 

President of the College 

1st Vice Chairman 

2nd Vice Chairman 

Secretary 

Treasurer 



Mr. Raleigh W. Greene, Jr. 
Dr. Thomas B. Southard 
Rt. Rev. Fidelis Dunlap, O.S.B. 
Rev. James Hoge, O.S.B. 
Mr. Thomas A. Welstead 
Mr. Jerard A. Kent 



Executive Committee 



Mr. John S. Burks 

Dade City, Florida 
Rt. Rev. Fidelis J. Dunlap, O.S.B. 

Saint Leo, Florida 

Mr. Raleigh W. Greene, Jr. 

St. Petersburg, Florida 

Rev. James Hoge, O. S. B. 

Crystal River, Florida 

Mr. Jerard A. Kent 

Lakeland, Florida 



Rev. Frank M. Mouch 

St. Petersburg, Florida 
Mr. Arthur H. Schrader, Jr. 

San Antonio, Florida 
Dr. Thomas B. Southard 

Saint Leo, Florida 
Mr. James F. Urbanski 

Tampa, Florida 
Mr. Thomas A. Welstead 

Bal Harbour, Florida 

Rev. Mother Carmen Young, O.S.B. 

Saint Leo, Florida 



Standing Committees 



Chairman, Academic Affairs Committee 
Chairman, Student Affairs Committee 



Rev. Frank M. Mouch 

Mr. Arthur H. Schrader, Jr. 



Chairman, Development and Public Re- 
la tion s Committee 



Mr. James F. Urbanski 



Chairman, Business Affairs Committee 



Mr. John S. Burks 



90 



BOARD OF TRUSTEES 



Mr. James J. Altman 

New Port Richey, Florida 

Mr. Adrian W. Bell, Sr. 

Brooksville, Florida 

Mr. Jerome H. P. Boucher 

New York, New York 
Rev. Marion Bowman, O.S.B. 

Saint Leo, Florida 

Mr. John S. Burks 

Dade City, Florida 
Mr. Fred J. Campa 

Tampa, Florida 
Mr. Daniel A. Cannon 

San Antonio, Florida 
Mr. William F. Davenport, Jr. 

St. Petersburg, Florida 
Mr. John P. Duane, Jr. 

Leesburg, Florida 
Rt. Rev. Fidelis J. Dunlap, O.S.B. 

Saint Leo, Florida 
Mr. Joseph F. Fogarty, Jr. 

Miami, Florida 
Mr. Thomas F. Glavey 

New York, New York 
Mr. Gerald Gould 

Lehigh Acres, Florida 
Col. Ira W. Grande 

Gulf port, Florida 
Mr. Raleigh W. Greene, Jr. 

St. Petersburg, Florida 
Mr. Arthur M. Hayes 

New York, New York 
Mr. Charles F. Henderson 

New York, New York 

Rev. James Hoge, O.S.B. 

Saint Leo, Florida 
Sen. Frederick B. Karl 

Daytona Beach, Florida 
Mr. Jerard A. Kent 

Lakeland, Florida 
Mr. Alfred O. Kiefer, Sr. 

San Antonio, Florida 



Mr. James F. Kingsley 

West Port, Connecticut 

Mr. Jay I. Kislak 

Miami, Florida 

Mr. James H. Langley, Jr. 

Brooksville, Florida 
Mrs. Helene Morris 

Sarasota, Florida 

Rev. Frank M. Mouch 

St. Petersburg, Florida 

Mr. D. William Overton 

Sarasota, Florida 

Mr. Arthur D. Pepin 

Tampa, Florida 

Mr. Francis J. Primosch 

Richmond, Virginia 

Mr. Arthur H. Schrader, Jr. 

San Antonio, Florida 

Mr. H. Earl Smalley 

Miami, Florida 

Mr. Robert A. Smalley 

Bronxville, New York 

Mr. Crawford Solomon 

Jacksonville, Florida 

Dr. Thomas B. Southard 

Saint Leo, Florida 

Mr. William Amory Underhill 

DeLand, Florida 

Mr. James F. Urbanski 

Tampa, Florida 

Sen. John T. Ware 

St. Petersburg, Florida 
Mr. William C. Webb 

Dade City, Florida 
Rev. William J. Weinheimer 

St. Petersburg, Florida 
Mr. Thomas A. Welstead 

Miami, Florida 
Rev. Mother Carmen Young, O.S.B. 

Saint Leo, Florida 



91 



ADMINISTRATIVE OFFICIALS 



President 

Vice President for Academic Affairs 

Vice President for Development and 

Public Relations 
Dean of Student Affairs 
Comptroller 



Dr. Thomas B. Southard 
Dr. Robert H. Peterson 

Mr. Allan J. Powers 

Sr. Lucy Faciane, O.S.B. 

Mr. Thomas Piazza 



ADMINISTRATIVE PERSONNEL 



Assistant to the President for 
Special Projects 

Assistant Registrar 

Associate Director of Admissions 

Chairman of the Division of 
Business Administration 

Chairman of the Division of 
Fine Arts 

Chairman of the Division of 

Language and Literature 

Chairman of the Division of 
Natural Science and 
Mathematics 

Chairman of the Division of 

Philosophy and Theology 

Chairman of the Division of 
Social Science 

Chief of Security 

Director of Athletics 

Director of Continuing 
Education 

Director of Counseling and 
Testing 

Director of Financial Aid 

Director of the Institute for 
Creative Teaching 

Director of Library Services 

Director of Men 

Director of Plant Operations 

Director of Public Information 

Director of Readers' Services 

Director of Records and 
Admissions 



A. James Christiansen 
Marion Ruffing 
Elizabeth A. Burke 

Thaddeus Tedrowe 

Earl S. Grauer 

Herbert H. Prizeman 

Rev. Damian DuQuesney, O.S.B. 

James Erpenbeck 

James J. Horgan 
Charles Gordon 
Norman D. Kaye 

Earl S. Grauer 

Wade Hopkin 
Peter Little 

Meltha Watts 

Donovan Schmoll 

Thomas J. Crosby 

Br. George Montpetit, O.S.B. 

Fred C. Mohrmann 

Sr. Dorothy Neuhofer, O.S.B. 

Rev. Dennis Murphy, O.S.B. 



92 



Director of Religious Programs 

Director of Social Affairs 

Director of Student 
Organizations 

Director of Tutorial Services 
Director of Women 
Manager of Computer Center 



Sr. Patricia Driscoll, O. S. B. 
Hazel Whitman 

Rev. Henry Riffle, O.S.B. 

Br. Giles Rettig, O.S.B. 
Rosa Fernandez 
Linda Blommel 



FACULTY DIRECTORY 



Prema Adisesh 

Reference Librarian; 

Assistant Professor 

B.S., Central College, Mysore; 

M.S. in L.S., Kent State University 

Setty Adisesh 

Associate Professor: Chemistry 
B.S., Central College, Mysore; 
M.S., Central College, Mysore; 
Ph.D., Kent State University 



David B. Cohen 
Professor: 



Psychology 
B.S., United States Naval Academy; 

M.S., Florida State University; 

Ph.D., Florida State University 



Mary T. Crosby 

Assistant Professor: Education 
B.S., Barry College; 
M.S., Barry College; 
Ed.D., University of Southern 
Mississippi 



Leopoldo Martinez Azoy 

Assistant Professor: Spanish 
B.A., Instituto Cuba; 
Ph.D., University of Havana 



Thomas J. Crosby 

Director of Men; 

Instructor: Physical Education; 

B.A., Saint Leo College 



Barbara Ann Berger 

Instructor: English 

B.A., University of South Florida; 

M.A., University of South Florida 



Thomas R. Brown 

Professor: English 
B.A., Colorado State College; 
M.A., Colorado State College; 
Ph.D., University of Denver 



Margo W. Burgess 

Teaching Assistant: Education 
B.A., Oglethorpe College 



Rev. Damian DuQuesnay, O.S.B 

Acting Chairman: Division of Natural 

Science 

and Mathematics; Assistant Professor: 

Biology 

B.S., St. Benedict College; 

M.A., Catholic University of America 



James Erpenbeck 

Chairman: Division of Philosophy and 

Theology 

Associate Professor: Philosophy 

B.A., St. Meinrad College; 

M.A., University of Notre Dame; 

Ph.D., University of Notre Dame 



William J . Casey 

Assistant Professor: Political Science 
B.S., St. Bonaventure; 
M.A., Georgetown University 



Sr. Lucy Faciane, O.S.B. 

Dean of Student Affairs 
B.A., Barry College; 
M.A., University of Florida 



93 



Ray N. Fleek 

Instructor: Business 

B.S., Jacksonville University; 

M.B.A., Florida State University 



Bro. Christopher Hall, O.S.B. 
Instructor: Mathematics 
B.A., St. Benedict's College 



Edward L. Flemming 

Professor: Psychology 

B.S., Bridgewater Teachers College 

M.Ed., Harvard; 

M.A., Columbia University; 

M.P.H., University of North Carolina; 

Ed.D., Columbia University 



Joseph D. Geiger 

Assistant Professor: Art 
A.B., University of Florida 



Llona Geiger 

Assistant Professor: German, French 
B.A., University of South Florida; 
M.A., University of South Florida 



Harry Gill 

Distinguished Professor: Political 

Science 

B.A., St. Brendan's College; 

M.A., University of London 

Msgr. Bernard Gingras 

Distinguished Professor: Psychology 
B.A., College of Ste. Marie; 
M.A., Jesuits; 

Ph.D., Montreal University; 
Ph.D., Universite de Paris 

Earl S. Grauer 

Chairman, Division of Fine Arts; 

Director of Continuing Education; 

Assistant Professor: Music 

B.M.Ed., University of Southern 

Mississippi; 

M.M., Southern Illinois University 



Lucian W. Grower 

Instructor: French, Spanish 
B.A., University of Redlands 

Richard W. Guenther 

Assistant Professor: Art 
B.A., University of Louisville; 
M.F.A., Indiana University 



Robert E. Hall 

Associate Professor: English 
B.A., Ohio John Carroll; 
M.A., Ohio John Carroll 



Dennis K. Henry 

Assistant Professor: Theatre 

B.A., Parsons College; 

M.A., Miami University of Ohio 

Lois Henry 

Instructor: Dance 
B.A., Elmira College 

Marguerite Hertz 

Assistant Professor: 
Women's Physical | Education 
B.S., Northern Illinois State 
Teacher's College; 
M.S., Indiana University 



John E. Higgins 

Assistant Director of Continuing 

Education; 

Assistant Professor: Music 
B.A., Morehead State College; 
M.A., Morehead State College 



Dixie Higgins 

Instructor: Education 

B.S., Eastern Kentucky State 

University; 

M.A.T., Indiana University 



Wade S. Hopkin 

Director of Counseling Center 

Assistant Professor: Psychology 
A.B., Ouachita College; 

B.D., Southwestern Theology 

Seminary; 

M.E. and Ed.S., New Orleans 

Theology Seminary 



94 



James J. Horgan 

Chairman, Division of Social Science; 
Associate Professor: History 
A.B., Athenaeum of Ohio; 
A.M., St. Louis University; 
Ph.D., St. Louis University 



M. L. Howe 

Distinguished Professor: English 
B.A., Otterbein College; 
M.A., Yale University; 
Ph.D., Yale University 

George C. Janner 

Assistant Professor: Business 
J.D., University of Vienna; 
M.B.A., University of South Florida; 
C.P.A. 



Marvin A. Kreidberg 

Assistant Professor: History 
B.A., University of Minnesota; 
B.S., University of Minnesota; 
M.A., University of Florida 



Sr. Mary Robert Liddell, O.P. 

Assistant Professor: Business 
B.S., Caldwell College; 
M.B.A., Seton Hall University 



Pablo A. Lopez (Leave of Absence) 
Assistant Professor: Spanish 
B.A., Indiana State University; 
M.S., Indiana State University; 
LL.D., University of Havana 



Barbara Kaplan 

Associate Professor: Music 
A.B., Agnes Scott College; 
M.A., Eastman School of Music; 
Ph.D., Florida State University 

Norman D. Kaye 

Director of Athletics; 

Associate Professor: Physical 

Education 

B.S., Northern Illinois University; 

M.A., Northern Illinois University 

John G. Keller 

Associate Professor: Biology 
B.S., Kent State University; 
D.D.S., Western Reserve University 

Harry A. Kenning 

Teaching Assistant: Physical 

Education 

B.A., University of South Florida 

John J. Kolfenbach 

Associate Professor: Chemistry 

B.A., Loras College; 

Ph.D., Iowa State University 

Rev. Henry J. Koren, C. S. Sp. 

Professor: Philosophy 

S.T.B., Gregorian; 

S.T.L., Gregorian; 

S.T.D., Catholic University of 

America 



Sr. Caroline Maertens, O.S.B. 

Assistant Professor: Education 
B.A.E., University of Florida; 
M.A., University of Notre Dame 



Elizabeth Maguire 

Assistant Professor: French 

Baccalaureat in Philosophy and 

Literature, 

Universite de Toulouse; 

B.A., University of South Florida; 

M.A., University of South Florida 



Rev. Malachy Maguire, O.S.B. 

Assistant Professor: Physics 

B.A., Seton Hall; 

M.S., Temple University 



Sr. Frances Martin, O.S.B. 

Assistant Professor: Sociology 
A.B., Webster College; 
M.A., University of Notre Dame; 
M.A., New York University 



Edward F. McCabe 

Assistant Professor: Physics 

B.S., United States Military Academy, 

West Point; 

M.S., Harvard University 



95 






William R. Meyer 

Head Baseball Coach; 
Instructor: Physical Education 
B.S., University of Missouri 



Br. Giles Rettig, O.S.B. 

Director of Tutorial Services ; 

Assistant Professor 

B.S., Pennsylvania State University 



Donald Moyer 

Instructor: Theatre 

B.A., University of South Florida 



Sr. Dorothy Neuhofer, O.S.B. 

Director of Readers' Service, 
Library; Assistant Professor 

B.S., Barry College; 

M.A. in L.S., Rosary College 



Raymond O'Connor 

Instructor: Business 
B.S., Hofstra University 



Ralph S. Pendexter, Jr. 

Assistant Professor: French, Spanish 
B. S., Virginia Polytechnic Institute; 
M.A., University of South Florida 



Robert H. Peterson 

Vice President for Academic Affairs; 

Professor: Chemistry 

B.A., St. John's University; 

M.S., North Dakota State University; 

Ph.D., University of Utah 



Donovan M. Schmoll 

Director of Library Services; 

Assistant Professor 

B.S.Ed., Illinois State University 

Normal; 

M.A., New York University; 

M.A. in L.S., University of Wisconsin 



Francis P. Sheridan 

Coordinator of Audio Visual Services; 
Instructor: Education 
B.A., Duquesne University; 
M.A., Columbia University 



Larry Sledge 

Assistant Professor: Music 

B.M., Southern Illinois University; 

M.M., Southern Illinois University 



Sr. Maura Snyder, O.S.B. 
Instructor: English 
A. B., Mount St. Scholastica College; 

M.A., University of Notre Dame 



Thomas B. Southard 
President 

B.A., Capital University; 
B.S., Capital University; 
M.A., Ohio State University; 
Ph.D., Ohio State University 






Dennis W. Phillips 

Assistant Professor: Art 
B.A., University of South Florida; 
B.F.A., Ringling School of Art; 
M.F.A., University of South Florida 



Rev. Edward Sullivan 

Instructor: Philosophy 
B. Ph., Trinity College; 

M.A., Niagara University 



Herbert H. Prizeman 

Chairman, Division of Language and 

Literature; 

Associate Professor: English 

B.A., New Mexico Western College; 

M.A., University of California; 

Ph.D., Tulane University 



John H. Swart 

Assistant Director of Athletics; 

Assistant Basketball Coach; 

Assistant Professor - Physical 

Education 

B.S., Illinois State University; 

M.S., Ilinois State University 



96 



Thaddeus Tedrowe 
Chairman; 

Division of Business Administration; 
Assistant Professor: Business 
B.S., Florida Southern College; 
M.B.A., University of South Florida 

Elizabeth Tesar 

Librarian; Instructor 

B.A., Saint Leo College; 

M.S. in L.S., Florida State University 



John F. Wendel 

Instructor: Political Science 
B.A., University of Florida; 
J.D., Stetson University 



Frances H. Wilkes 

Instructor: English 

B.A., University of South Florida 



Rev. Mark Toon, O.S.B. 

Professor: Philosophy 

B.A., St. Meinrad College; 

M.A., Catholic University of America; 

Ph.D., Catholic University of America 



James E. Woodard, Jr. 

Assistant Professor: English 
B.A., University of the Americas; 
M.A., University of the Americas; 
Ph.D., University of New Mexico 



Meltha Watts 

Director, Institute for Creative 

Teaching; 

Assistant Professor: Education 

B.A., Bowling Greene State University; 

M.A., University of Michigan 



Miguel Zepeda 

Assistant Professor: Mathematics 
B.A., Syracuse University; 
M.A., Syracuse University 



97 



INDEX 



Academic Calendar 6 

Academic Honors 34 

Academic Program 24 

Academic Regulations 30 

Academic Standing 32 

Accounting 44 

Achievement Tests 

of CEEB 15 

Administrative Officers 92 

Administrative Personnel ... 92 

Admission Eligibility 14 

Admission Procedures 16 

Advanced Placement 15 

Advisors, Faculty 24, 37 

Aid, Financial 20 

Alumni Association 41 

Application for 

Admission 16 

Art 48 

Associates of Arts Degree . 27, 47 
Associates of Arts 

Degree 27, 47 

Athletics 37 

Attendance, Class 31 

Audit 31 

Automobiles on Campus .... 40 

Awards and Honors 34 

Bachelor of Arts Degree .... 33 

Basic Studies Program 24 

Biology 61 

Board of Trustees 90 

Buildings and Grounds 9 

Business Administration, 

Division of 43 

Calendar, Academic 6 

Calendar, Social 12 

Campus, Description of .... 9 

Cars on Campus 40 

Chemistry 63 

Choir, Chorus 13 

Clubs, Campus 38 

College Board Examinations . 1 5 
College Community Artist 

Series 12 

Commencement 33, 34 

Concentrations 25,42 

Continuing Education 86 

Costs 17 

Counseling Program 36 

Courses of Instruction 42 

Creative Teaching, 

Institute for 80 

Credit by Examination 31 

Dean's List 34 

Degree Seeking 16 



Degrees, Requirements for . . 33 

Degrees, Application for .... 33 

Dentistry 27, 61 

Deposits 17 

Director, Religious 

Programs 37 

Directory of Correspondence . . 5 
Division of Business 

Administration 43 

Division of Fine Arts 48 

Division of Language 

and Literature 56 

Division of Natural Science 

and Mathematics 61 

Division of Philosophy 

and Theology 68 

Division of Social Science ... 71 

Drama 13,54 

Drops and Adds 31 

Early Admission 14 

Economics 44 

Educational Grants 20 

Elementary Education 80 

Employment, Student 20 

English 56 

English Competency 16 

Ensemble, Wind 13 

Entrance Requirements .... 14 
Examinations, Senior 

Comprehensive 26 

Examinations, Sophomore 

Comprehensive 26 

Expenses 

Faculty Directory 93 

Fees, Laboratory 18 

Fees, Special 18 

Fields of Concentration . . 25,42 

Finance 45 

Financial Aid 20 

Financial Information 17 

Financial Responsibility .... 19 

Fine Arts, Division of 48 

Flexibility 26 

Foreign Languages 59 

Foreign Students 16 

Foreign Study 27 

Fraternities 38 

French 59 

Freshman Orientation 36 

General Business 

Administration 46 

German 59 

Grade Changes 15 

Grading 15 

Grade Point Average 15 



98 



Graduation Honors 

and Awards 34 

Graduation Requirements ... 33 

Grants, Educational 20 

Health Service, Student .... 39 

History 72 

Honors and Awards 34 

Hours for Men 40 

Hours for Women 40 

Humanities 51 

Independent Study 

and Research 26 

Institute for Creative 

Teaching 80 

Intercollegiate Athletics .... 24 

Intramural Program 24 

Jobs, Campus 20 

Junior College 

Graduates 15, 25 

Junior Year Abroad 27 

Laboratories 10, 1 1 

Language Laboratory 11 

Law 27, 73 

Library 11 

Language and Literature, 

Division of 56 

Loan Programs 20 

Map, Locational 4 

Management 46 

Marketing 47 

Mathematics 65 

Medical Care 39 

Medicine 27, 61 

Military Service Credits 15 

Motor Vehicles on Campus . . 40 

Music 51 

Natural Science and Mathematics, 

Division of 61 

Non-degree Seeking 16 

Organizations, Campus 38 

Parents' Confidential 

Statement 20, 23 

Payment Schedule 18 

Parents Weekend 12 

Philosophy 68 

Philosophy of Saint 

Leo College 8 

Philosophy and Theology, 

Division of 68 

Physical Education 24, 84 

Physics 67 

Play Production 13, 54 

Political Science 73 

Pre-Professional Programs ... 27 
President's Scholarships .... 22 



Probation 32 

Professional Schools, 

Preparation for 27 

Psychology 76 

Publications, Campus 38 

Re-admission 16 

Recreation 37 

Refunds 19 

Religious Life 37 

Residence Requirements .... 33 

Residential Living 40 

Room, Cost of 17 

Scholarships 20 

Scholastic Honors 34 

Scholastic Deficiency 32 

Secondary Teaching 81 

Secretarial Science 47 

Seminars 26 

Senior Comprehensive 

Examinations 26 

Senior Honors 34 

Social Science, 

Division of 71 

Social Life and Activities ... 12 

Sociology 77 

Spanish 59 

Special Students 16 

Speech 59 

Sports 37 

Student Aid 20 

Student Government 

Association 38 

Student Handbook 36 

Student Health 39 

Student Load 31 

Student Publications 38 

Studies Abroad 27 

Suspension 32 

Teacher Education 

Program 80 

Theatre 54 

Theology 71 

Transfer to Saint 

Leo College 15 

Transportation to 

Saint Leo College 5 

Travel, Foreign 27 

Trustees, Board of 90 

Tuition 17 

Tuisition Aids 20 

Tutorial Services 27 

Veterans 21 

Vocational Counseling 36 

Withdrawal from College .... 32 

Withdrawal from a Course ... 31 



99 



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